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Children of (1103) Donald Munson and Mildred (Richter) Sprague

FOUR CENTURIES OF THE

 

SPRAGUE FAMILY

 

IN NORTH AMERICA

 

 

 

FIRST SERVING THE BRITISH CROWN THROUGH THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WARS, AND LATER AS PATRIOTS IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.  THIS FAMILY HAS GIVEN OF HER SON’S IN THE VAST MAJORITY OF OUR COUNTRIES WARS AND CONFLICTS.  UNTOLD NUMBERS HAVE SERVED THEIR COUNTRY AND MANY PAID THE SUPREME PRICE IN DEFENDING OUR FREEDOM.  LET NO MAN SAY THAT FREEDOM IS OF NO SIGNIFICANCE.

 

 

 

 

 

THIS DOCUMENT IS A DRAFT PLEASE FORWARD ANY CHANGES TO:

 

mailto:spraguee@yahoo.com

 

DEATH ENDS A LIFE, BUT IT DOES NOT END A RELATIONSHIP, WHICH LIVES ON IN THE SOUL OF THE SURVIVORS.


FRANCIS SPRAGUE

Of Duxbury, Mass

 

 

1.   Francis Sprague came on the "good ship Anne" which sailed From London England, and arrived at Plymouth, July 1623. He was one of those "passengers" who, Morton writes, "seeing the low and poor conditions of those that were before them, were much daunted and dismayed, and according to their divers humors, were diversely affected. Some wished themselves in England again; others; fell to weeping, fancying their own misery in what they saw in others; some pitying the distress they saw their friends had long been in, and still were under. In a word all were full of sadness; only some of their old friends rejoiced to see them, and it was no worse with them, for they could not

expect it should be better, and now hoped they should enjoy better days together.  And truly it was no marvel they should be thus affected, for they were in a low condition, both in respect of food and clothing at that time." Governor Bradford, in allusion to the passengers who came in the Anne and the James, says: "The best dish we could present them with, is a lobster, or a piece of fish, without bread, or any thing else but a cup of fair spring water; and the long continuance of this diet, with our labors abroad, has somewhat abated the freshness of our complexion; but God gives us health" (New England's Memorial, Davis' edition, p. 102, and Young Chronicles of the Pilgrims, p. 353.)

 

     He married in England, Lydia ___ (Gen. Dict. R.I. 69), who with their daughter came with him.

 

1623, autumn, He shared in the division of lands with those who came in the Anne.

 

1627, at the division of cattle he gives the names of his children as Ann and Mary.

 

1627, July. Signed an agreement with William Bradford and others pertaining to the carrying on of the fur trade. (Gen. Gleanings from England, 1901.)

 

1632-3, Jan 2. Was taxed at Plymouth, being assessed for 18 shillings.

 

1632, About this date he settled in N.E. part of Duxbury, near the Nook, so called..

 

1637. June 17, Admitted Freeman of the Colony.

 

1637. Licensed to sell spirituous liquors.

 

1640. Owned land on North River.

 

1644. April 1, Deeded to his son-in-law William Lawrence 50 Acres on South River.

 

1645. was one of the original proprietors of Bridgewater, but he nor any of his family came to reside there says Mitchell. He was one of the original purchasers of Dartmouth.

 

1659. Oct 26. Deeded to his son-in-law Ralph Earle of Rhode Island.

 

1666. Was an Inn Holder up to this date and owned considerable property.  Mr. Sprague did not adhere strictly to the enactments of the civil code of the Puritan Fathers and was several times brought before the Court for what they considered departures from the principles of the Puritans, but considered from the present standards of estimating the character of men; he must have been a person of worth and respectability. We know that he was the head of a most honorable and respected family of descendants. Further mention is made of him in "The Pilgrim Republic," 1888, Goodwin, pp. 362, 596.

 

1669. His son John succeeded to his business of "keeping an Ordinary" or tavern, where spirituous liquors were sold, and it is presumed that his death occurred shortly before.

 

1662. The Court admonished good wife Tubbs (his daughter Mercy) for "mixed dancing"; she left her husband and in 1668 the court granted him a divorce. They had a son, William Tubbs, Jr. who married in 1691 to Judith the widow of Isaac Baker. (Ref., Savage's Gen. Dict; Sprague Memorial 1847, Soule.)

 

 

No records seem to exist presenting the reasons or circumstances which might have prompted Francis Sprague and his family to leave England and embark upon what was to be a new and often perilous life in the colonies.  It can however be surmised that those reasons were not purely religious, as were those of many of the others who had chosen to become part of the colonial endeavor in New England.  This is made evident by a number of subsequent factors. One indication is the fact that Francis Sprague, rather than having been designated as one of the Saints or true Puritans by George F. Wilson in his book SAINTS AND STRANGERS, publish 1945 by Reynal and Hitchcock of New York, was instead designated as having been among the so-called “Strangers”.  These “Strangers” were those who were part of the colony but who did not strictly adhere to the Puritan religious principles.  For even though he had immigrated and settled with the Puritan or Pilgrim Company at Plymouth Colony, Soule’s descriptive narrative of him in Sprague Memorial makes the following descriptive notation regarding him:  “It appears that grave and sober though he was, he did not wholly escape the displeasure of the scrupulous magistrates of those days. The Court records disclose the fact that he was several times brought before them for what they considered departures from the strict line of duty. A fair interpretation, however, of the evidence, drawn from the Old Colony Records, warrants the conclusion that Francis (Sprague) was a person of ardent temperament and of great independence of mind; in short, that his sympathies with the principles of the

 Puritan Fathers did not go the length of Passive acquiescence in all the enactments of their civil code.  We know that he was the head of a most honorable and respected family of descendants."

     Regardless of their reasons for having done so, Francis Sprague, his wife and daughter left England in early 1623 and arrived at Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts on or about July 10 of that same year, and all three were later designated as having been among the 189 settlers who were to be acknowledged as the “Founding Fathers of America”.

     In the fall of 1623, Francis Sprague and his family participated in a harvest feast that also turned into a celebration of the marriage of Governor William Bradford to Alice Southworth.  This feast, which was attended by local Indian chief Massasoit and 120 of his people, was the occasion that has since become noted as the first Thanksgiving.

     Shortly after arriving at Plymouth Colony, Francis Sprague took part in a division of land among the passengers of the ship ANNE in which he was granted a plot of land that may he been about 100 acres or more.

    On November 5, 1623, Francis Sprague took part in what may well have been one of the first “volunteer” fire fighting efforts to have taken place in New England.  On the evening a fire broke out in one of the settlement houses that soon spread to and destroyed two or three other houses and threatened to engulf the storehouse where the settlement’s winter food supply was being kept.  Governor Bradford organized the fire fighting effort and the food stores were saved. It was later discovered that the fire had resulted from a deliberate act of arson.  Sometime around May or June of 1627 Francis Sprague obtained a number of head of cattle in a division of livestock among the colonists.  In July of that same hear, he entered into an agreement with Governor Bradford regarding the fur trade and was thus well on his way to becoming one of the more well to do and respected citizens of Plymouth Colony.

     On January 2, 1632 he was taxed 18 shillings on his land and holding at Plymouth.  Shortly after this, apparently seeking larger and more fertile fields, he and his family moved to the northeast area of what was then known as the “Duxburrow Side” of the bay north of Plymouth Colony.  This area has since become the city of Duxbury, Massachusetts.

     At Duxburrow they settled on a large grant of land adjoining that of Elder William Brewster, not far from the town meeting house.  This land, near what was known as the “Nook”, lay along a bay with good meadows, salt marshes and a creek that is still known as Sprague’s Creek.

     On June 17, 1637 Francis Sprague was admitted as a Freeman of the Massachusetts Colony.  Such status, given only to male members of the colony, required the passing of a rigorous examination of the individual’s religious views and moral character.  There is some indication that may have required formal membership in the church.  And finally, it required that the applicant own property valued at no less than 20 pounds, though this later requirement was not strictly enforced.  That same year he was granted a license to sell liquor in New England and on October 1, 1637 he established what has since been recognized as having been on of the first taverns and inns to operate in New England.

    At least four other such establishments are known to have existed in the region about this same time, some perhaps before that of Francis Sprague.  James Cole operated a tavern just above Plymouth, and others in the area were either owned or operated by Constant Southworth, Assistant Governor of the colony William Collier and by Isaac Robinson.

     All of these establishments faced the same problems, problems which appear to have been purposely directed toward them by the religious minded, colonial authorities. There were officials appointed for the sole purpose of following patrons into such taverns and then monitoring their intake of liquor, individuals who had the authority to force the tavern operator to stop serving any individual or group of persons if, in that official’s mind, such persons were beyond what they felt to be the “legal” limits of intoxication.  The officials have often been noted as having made extreme nuisances of themselves.  In addition, no tobacco could be used in the taverns, no card playing was tolerated nor was dice gaming.  Beyond that, official approval and permission to operate a tavern that serves liquor was usually granted only to the most respectable persons, and such approval was seldom given to anyone known to drink to intoxication.  Tavern owners were also held responsible for the sobriety of their patrons and could b brought to account equally for the actions of any of their patrons who, when intoxicated, caused some problem.

     That Francis Sprague was of such independence of mind as to balk at such official interference with the process of free trade is indicated by the fact that within next year his liquor license was suspended for his “…drinking overmuch and toleration too  much jollity” and was admonished for purposely and knowing serving guest beyond the legal limit.  That suspension was lifted through by the end of 1638.

     Sometime around this same period of time Francis Sprague became a member of the Duxbury Militia under the leadership of Captain Myles Standish.

     In 1640 he obtained more land near Duxbury, along the North River.  On April 1, 1644 he deeded a 50 acre tract of land along the South River to William Lawrence, husband of his daughter Mary.  This may well have been a wedding present.

     In 1645 Francis Sprague became one of the original proprietors of Bridgewater, Massachusetts and also co-purchased, with the Earle family, a large amount of land at the present site of Dartmouth, in what is presently Rhode Island apparently as the first stage toward the establishment of a settlement at that location.  The site was subsequently settled in 1650 and became incorporated as the town of Dartmouth in 1664.

     In 1648 and again in 1657 he served as Surveyor of Highways for the area and in 1649 he served as Constable of Duxbury.

     On October 26, 1659 he deeded land to his son-in-law Ralph Earle of Rhode Island.  This land, given on the occasion of the marriage of Ralph Earle to Dorcas Sprague, daughter of Francis Sprague and Anne ___ (?), was apparently a wedding present and had been some of the land purchased at Dartmouth, considering that the newlyweds almost immediately settled at Dartmouth, Rhode Island after their marriage.  Several months after this, in 1660, Francis Sprague’s wife Anne ___(?) died in Duxbury.

     On June 5, 1666 Francis Sprague’s liquor license was again suspended because of a brawling incident in his tavern. This suspension was also temporary, being lifted a short time later.

     On October 29, 1669 Francis Sprague’s son John entered into co-proprietorship of the family tavern.  This may have taken place because of advancing age of the founder of this family line in America.  Following both their deaths in 1676, this inn was owned and operated by John Sprague’s son William, who later passed it on to his son Jethro.  Its fate after that time is presently unknown.

     Francis Sprague is reported to have died in 1676, sometime after March of that year and after the death of his son John.  He is reported as having been one of the 10 wealthiest men in New England at the time of his death.

 

 

 

 

 


Children of (101) Francis and Lydia      Sprague

 

201. Ann.

 

202. Mary. One of these married Robert Lawrence.

 

203. Mercy. Married on Nov 9, 1637, to William Tubbs.  On Mar 2, 1651/1652 Mercy Tubbs was warned to appear “to answer for mixed dancing for which she was cleared by admonition”.  On Oct 3, 1663, she was fined 50 shillings as was Joseph Rogers for “obscene & lascivious behavior each with the other.”  Rogers lost his status as Lt. at the time but the court reestablished it on Jun 6, 1164.  On Jun 8, 1664, William was allowed to “disown all debts that she (Mercy) shall make”.  On Jun 3, 11668, the court wrote to Mercy in Rhode Island to inform her that if she didn’t return to her husband before the first Tuesday in July, then William would be divorced from her.

     One Joseph Rogers in June, 1663, was ordered to remove his dwelling from Manassakeesett, because he had been keeping company with Mercy Sprague Tubbs “in a manner as have given cause at least to suspect that there hath been lascivious acts committed by them”.  Rogers was threatened with severe whipping if he were found near Mercy or the Tubbs’ house again.  William was ordered not to allow Rogers to come to his house.  AA Joseph Rogers (1607-1678) was a Mayflower passenger, died Eastham, Jan 1678.  He was a freeman, 1633, and ran the ferry over the Jones River.  Joseph has a son, Joseph, Jr., who was killed 1660. No knowledge if this is the Joseph with whom Mercy Sprague Tubbs is accused of consorting.  Joseph, Sr., was a son of Thomas who died soon after landing.

 

204. John. Married in 1655 to Ruth Basset, born 1634, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Tilden) Basset. They resided for a time in Marshfield, as the birth of their daughter Ruth is recorded there.

     This John, more likely than John son of William, was a Counselor of Sir Edmund Andros, mentioned in Hutch. i, 354. He was slain in Pierce's fierce fight at Pawtucket in Philip's war, March 26, 1676. His estate was appraised in 1676 and was sworn to by the widow Ruth Sprague. She afterwards married ___Thomas.

(Plymouth Co. Mass., Probate.)

 

The son of Francis and Anne Sprague, John was born about 1637, probably in Duxbury, Massachusetts.  In 1655 he married Ruth Basset whose father, William Basset (born about 1590 in England) had arrived in America in 1621 aboard the ship FORTUNE (Thomas Barton, Master).

     John Sprague and his wife Ruth Basset lived in Marshfield, Massachusetts for a number of years before settling at Duxbury around 1668.  Shortly after their arrival in Duxbury, he became co-proprietor of his father’s tavern in Duxbury and remained such until his death.

 

     John Sprague apparently inherited his father’s ardent temperament.  Described as a

“…spark off the old flint”. He is known to have spent several hours in the stocks on at least one occasion for “…highly misdemeaning himself in the house of James Cole of Plymouth near unto or on the evening before the Sabbath Day, in drinking, gaming and uncivil reveling, to the dishonor of God and the offense of the government, by his gaming and the bringing of his mare uncivil into the parlor of James Cole, aforesaid.”

     It is believed that he was the John Sprague who was a counselor to Sir Edmund Andros, rather that the John Sprague who was the son of William Sprague.  John Sprague was killed in the massacre of Captain Michael Pierce’s Company of English Militia during the King Philip’s War when, on March 26, 1676, that company of 65 men (supplemented by about 20 friendly Indians) engaged a superior force of hostiles near the Pawtucket River in Rhode Island, about 5 miles north of Providence. 

     According to Douglas Edward Leach in his history of that war entitled FLINTLOCK AND TOMAHAWK – NEW ENGLAND IN THE KING PHILIP’S WAR, Captain Pierce, having determined that there was a band of hostile Indian located near the Pawtucket River, had prepared his men for battle and had sent a messenger into the nearby town of Providence requesting reinforcements before attacking.

     For some reason this messenger, arriving at the time of public worship, chose to wait until after the service had concluded before delivering Captain Pierce’s request.  When the situation was made know, Captain Andrew Edmunds of the Providence Militia immediately set out with a group of armed men in order to join force with Pierce’s company.

     Meanwhile, the Plymouth Militia group had unwittingly engaged and become surrounded by an extremely large force of hostile Narrangansett Indians and was overwhelmed.  By the time Edmunds and his men arrived, it was too late.

     The fact that some 42 of the 55 colonists killed that day were buried at the site of the battle, including that of John Sprague of Duxbury, indicates that there were some survivors, or it may indicate that there were bodies which may not have been recovered.

 

205. Dorcas, married Oct 26, 1659, Ralph Earle, son of Ralph and Joan___ and settled in Dartmouth. (Earle Gen. p. 21.)

 

                                                                                                                                                                             

 

 

 

Children of (204) John and Ruth (Basset) Sprague

 

301. Lieut. John, of Lebanon, Conn., born about 1656 in Duxbury, Mass.; died March 6, 1727-8, married (1) Lydia ___, who died July 18, 1725. He married (2) March 21, 1726-7, Lois Abel, who survived him. (Lebanon's Old Rec., p. 278.)

 

     "John Sprague of Duxbery In ye County ** of New Plymouth, Weaver, being Grandson of Frances Sprague Deed & eldest son of & heir to John Sprague also Deceased both formerly of ye above sd town County * Jurisdiction having by Lineal Decent a Real Right ** to One half of a purchase of Land Lying In ** Dartmouth ** now in the * occupation of my Uncle Ralf Earle." grantor to "John Earle if sd Dartmouth * all my Real and Right title interest & property In & to the half share of Land having full power & Lawful Authority to Dispose of ye same ** by virtue of Decent from Francis Sprague aforesd the original purchaser & proprietor * Eleventh day of October Anno Domi 1686.

 

                                       John Sprague

                                       Lydia Sprague

(Bristol Co., Mass., Deeds xxxi. 156)

 

     He was Constable of Duxbury in 1692, and held other public trusts there at various times from 1684 to 1701. He was one of the conspicuous members of the Church of Duxbury.

 

1702-3. Jan 8. John Sprague, "Mainer" and Lydia his wife, of Duxbury, deeded 40 acres of upland with dwelling house and bard standing thereon in Duxbury for 124 pounds to Israel Sylvester of Scitauate. (Plymouth Co. Deeds, v. 103) His last deed in Duxbury was given Jan 28, 1702-3.

 

1703. He removed to Lebanon, Conn., probably in the spring of this year and became the owner of much land there.

 

1705, 1710, 1714, Selectman, Lebanon.

 

1706. May and Oct.; 1708, May and Oct.; 1709, May and Oct.; 1711,

1713, in May; 1714, 1716, 1718, in Oct; 1719, May and Oct.: 1720, May. Representative from Lebanon to General Court.

 

1706. He bore the title of Ensign; and of Lieut. from 1710 to 1720.

 

1712-3. Jan 8. He deeded to son Benjamin Sprague, land in Lebanon.

 

1713-4. Jan 19. He deeded to son John Sprague, 120 acres of land.

 

1714. Sept 21. He deeded to George Way Jr., of Lyme, 100 acres of land.

 

1715-6. Jan 18. He deeded to son Samuel Sprague 120 acres of land.

(See Lebanon deeds. ii. 372, 426, 460, 515.)

 

1718. July 14. John Sprague, Sr., and John Sprague, Jr., agree to liberate Jack, an Indian slave bought by them, when he has served faithfully 12 years, and give him a colt which they agree to keep free of charge until Jack sees fit to dispose of him. They also give him a ewe sheep, which they agree to keep and her increase for two years. (Ibid. iii, 95)

 

1726. July 6. Will mentions beloved wife, Mrs. Lois Sprague, granddaughter, Mary Way, and son Ephraim Sprague. (Windham Co. Probate, i, 246.)

 

302. William.

 

303. Ruth, born Feb 12, 1659-0; married Aug 12, 1680, to Elizer Smith of Dartmouth.

 

304. Eliza.

 

305. Desire, born about 1665; married Nov 24, 1696, to John Gifford of Sandwich, Mass.

 

306. Samuel. Born about 1670.

 

307. Doreas, married Jan 10, 1710, to Joseph Hatch of Falmouth.

 

(2)Ruth Basset, b. 1634 (1)William Basset.

 

(13)Ruth Basset  b. 1634, (12)Elizabeth Tilden b. 1603, (11) Nathaniel Tilden b. 1583, (10)Thomas Tilden b. 1546, (9) Richard (Tylden) Tilden b. 1520, (8) Richard John Tiyden b. 1475, (7) Robert Tylden b. 1440, (6)John Tylden b. 1406, (5)Thomas (or John) Tylden b. 1378, (4)Thomas Tylden b. 1350, (3)Thomas De Tydenne b. 1288, (2)Henri De Tydenne b. 1260, (1)Henri De Teldene b. 1235.

 

(11)Ruth Basset  b. 1634, (10)Elizabeth Tilden b. 1603, (9) Nathaniel Tilden b. 1583, (8)Thomas Tilden b. 1546, (7) Richard (Tylden) Tilden b. 1520, (6) Richard John Tiyden b. 1475, (5) Robert Tylden b. 1440, (6)John Tylden b. 1406, (4)Thomas (or John) Tylden b. 1378, (3)Thomas Tylden b. 1350, (2) Isolde Reve b. 1329, (1)John Reve  b. 1294.

 

(9)Ruth Basset  b. 1634, (8)Elizabeth Tilden b. 1603, (7) Nathaniel Tilden b. 1583, (6)Thomas Tilden b. 1546, (5) Richard (Tylden) Tilden b. 1520, (4) Richard John Tiyden b. 1475, (3) Robert Tylden b. 1440, (2John Tylden b. 1406, (1)Jan Johanna Telden b. abt. 1383.

 

(4)Ruth Basset b. 1634, (3)Elizabeth Tilden b. 1603, (2) Nathaniel Tilden b. 1583, (1)Alice Bigge b. 1548.

 

(6)Ruth Basset  b. 1634, (5)Elizabeth Tilden b. 1603, (4) Nathaniel Tilden b. 1583, (3)Thomas Tilden b. 1546, (2)Richard (Tylden) Tilden b. 1520, (1) Joan Unknown,  b. abt. 1482.

 

(5)Ruth Basset  b. 1634, (4)Elizabeth Tilden b. 1603, (3) Nathaniel Tilden b. 1583, (2)Thomas Tilden b. 1546, (1)Elizabeth Glover  b. 1515.                                                                                                                                                                                 

 

Children of (301) Lieut. John and Lydia     Sprague

 

401. Ephraim, born March 15, 1684-5.

 

402. Benjamin, of Lebanon, Conn., born July 15, 1686, in Duxbury, Mass.; died 1754,Lebanon; married (1) Dec 29, 1707,in Lebanon to Mary Woodworth, born 1683, who died July 10, 1725 in her 43rd year. He married (2) Jan 26, 1726 in Stonington, Conn., to Mrs. Prudence Denison, widow of Joseph Denison and daughter of Dr. Joseph Minor. She died in Stonington on May 18,1726, age 38 years. (Lebanon Insc.) He married (3) Abigail (Hodge) Tisdale, widow of Elkannah Tisdale of Taunton, Mass.' who died leaving two children, vis: Elkanah and Elijah Tisdale. (Lebanon's Old Rec., 275.)

In his Will dated Jan 28, 1747-8 (probated July 8, 1754), he says he has given a farm to his eldest son John; to his son Elikim he has given a farm and built him a house: to his daughter Mary, and after her death to her two children, sufficient to make Mary's portion; to his son William the value of three hundred and twenty-four pounds; to his daughter Jerusha one hundred pounds; to his son Phineas the little house and barn across the way and all the land which adjoins it; to his son Benjamin two hundred and fifty pounds; to his four daughters by his present wife, vis: Abigail, Lydia, Ester and Mary, to each one hundred pounds: to his three youngest sons by his present wife, viz: Sillas, Elkanah and Minor, an equal division of the residue. (Windham Probate iv, 438)

 

403. Samuel.

 

404. John, born about 1690.

 

405. Lydia, married July 19, 1713, to George Way Jr. of Lebanon.

 

406. Irene, married Jul 9, 1723 to Aaron Fish born 1693,the son of Samuel and Sarah. (History of Stonington.)

 

407. Ruth September 5, 1704; married Nov 12, 1724 to Clodus Dill.

 

 

 

Children of (402) Benjamin and Mary (Woodworth) Sprague

 

501. John, born September 5, 1709.

 

502. Elikim, born October 10, 1711.

 

503. Mary, born March 5, 1713-4; died before 1754; married Igntius Barker.

 

504. William, born September 29, 1715.

 

505. Phineas, resident of Lebanon, Conn., farmer, born September 5, 1717; died in 1772; married between 1751-52 to Sarah Dyer b. Sep 30, 1733 in Coventry, Tolland, Ct. she d. in 1775.

 

506. Jerusha, born October 20, 1720.

 

507. Benjamin, born June 5, 1725; married Abigail Tredway of Bozrah, Conn. on May 29, 1748. Probably moved to Vermont or Old Hampshire Co., Mass.

 

(3) Mary Woodworth b.1683, (2) Benjamin Woodworth b. 1649 (1)Walter Woodworth, b. 1619.

 

(3) Mary Woodworth, (2) Benjamin Woodworth, Deborah Damon,b. 1642.

 

(2) Mary Woodworth, (1) Deborah (Perhaps Benjamin).

 

Children of (402) Benjamin and (3rd wife) Abigail (Hodge) (Tisdale) Sprague

 

508. Silas, born Jan 30, 1727-8.

 

509. Abigail, born Nov 23, 1729; married September 19, 1751 to Benjamin Smith.

 

510. Elkanah, born Jan 25, 1732-3.

 

511. Minor, born March 5, 1734-5.

 

512. Lydia, born March 20, 1736-7; married Nov 16, 1761 to James Cooper.

 

513. Ester, born March 3, 1738-9; married June 2, 1763 to Abner Gardner.

 

514. Mary, born September 10, 1740; married June 19, 1762 to Daniel Loomis and moved to Coventry.

 

Children of (505) Phineas and Sarah (Dyer) Sprague

 

Children born in Lebanon, Conn.

 

601. Phineas, He was baptized on Aug 23,1752. He served in the American Revolution enlisting in Captain James Clark's Company, May 13, 1775; discharged Dec 18, 1775; enlisted again, Apr 1, 1777, for three years, in Captain Brigham's Company, "Continental Line"; reported as "missing in action on Oct 4, 1777." The British hoping to catch General Washington led an expedition from New York to Philadelphia, the capital. Philadelphia was captured in September overcoming Washington at the battle of Brandywine and inflicting a further

defeat on the Americans at Germantown, Pennsylvania on October 4, 1777. Thus the Sprague family gives again one of her sons so that others might live. He left two young daughters Mary and Sarah Sprague.

 

602. Beriah, baptized August 11, 1754, in Lebanon, Conn. He died in about 1805, probably at Auburn, New York; married Elizabeth Bliss.  Her father was Samuel Bliss Jr. b. 1731, and her mother was Elizabeth Pineo b. 1738.  The Massachusetts Committee of Public Safety called for an army of 30,000 men. Groups of militia from all over New England marched toward Boston. General Gage found himself besieged.  Beriah marched from Lebanon for the Relief of Boston and Lexington with his older brother Phineas in Captain James Clark's Company, on May 7, 1775.  On May 13, 1775 his younger brother Dyre enlisted into the same Company. The three brothers would serve together through the  Battle of Bunker Hill until December 18,1775 when they were discharged. He was a taxpayer and grand juror in Whitingham, Vermont, in 1781. Later he moved to Hartford, New York, where some of his children were born. (Conn. Men in the Revolution)

 

603. Dyre, also spelled Dyah, Diah and Dyer. He was born in or near Lebanon, Conn., He enlisted in Conn., in Captain Clark's Company, May 13, 1775; discharged Dec 18, 1775. On May 25,1787, he bought of William Bunson, land in Washington, Berkshire Co., Mass., where he settled. On July 6, 1810, he sold two tracts of land in Washington. 

 

604. Sarah, died before March 3, 1783.

 

605. Mary, married Simeon Jones.

 

606. Deborah.

 

 

(7)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733 (6)Henry Dyer b.1693, (5)Henry Dyer, b. 1676 (4)Samuel Dyer, b. 1635 (3)William Dyer, b. 1609 (2)William, b. 1580 (1)John Dyer b. 1650.

 

(6)Sarah Dyer b. 1733, (5)Henry Dyer b. 1693, (4)Henry Dyer b. 1676, (3)Samuel Dyer b. 1635 (2)William Dyer b 1609, William Dyer b. 1580 (1)Jane Ermley b. 1560.

 

(9)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (8)Henry Dyer, b. 1693 (7)Henry Dyer, b. 1676  (6)Samuel Dyer, b. 1635 (5) Mary Barrett b. 1610 (4)Thomas Barrett b. 1593, (3)Christopher Barrett b. 1562, (2)William Barrett b. 1522, (1)William Barrett b. 1496.

 

(6)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733,  (5)Henry Dyer, b. 1693 (4)Henry Dyer, b. 1676  (3)Samuel Dyer, b. 1635 (2) Mary Barrett b. 1610, (1)Margaret Huntington b. 1593.

 

 

(8)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (7)Henry Dyer, b. 1693 (6)Henry Dyer, b. 1676  (5)Samuel Dyer, b. 1635 (4) Mary Barrett b. 1610 (3)Thomas Barrett b. 1593, (2)Elizabeth Clark b. 1564, (1)Allen Clark b. 1538.

 

(8)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (7)Henry Dyer, b. 1693 (6)Henry Dyer, b. 1676  (5)Samuel Dyer, b. 1635 (4) Mary Barrett b. 1610, (3)Thomas Barrett b. 1593, (2)Christopher Barrett b. 1562, (1)Margaret Wingfielde b. 1530.

 

(10)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (9)Henry Dyer, b. 1693 (8)Henry Dyer, b. 1676  (7)Samuel Dyer, b. 1635 (6) Mary Barrett b. 1610 (5)Thomas Barrett b. 1593, (4)Christopher Barrett b. 1562, (3)William Barrett b. 1522, (2)Margaret Love b. 1500,        (1)Richard Love b. 1473.

 

(2)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (1)Mary Royce

 

(6)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (5)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (4)Mary Rice b. 1675, (3)Matthew Rice b. 1630-32, (2)Edmond Rice, b. 1594,  (1)Henry Rice, b. 1555.

 

(7)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (6)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (5)Mary Rice, b. 1675 (4)Matthew Rice b. 1630-32, (3)Edmond Rice, b. 1594, (2)Margaret Baker, b. 1566, (1)Thomas Baker b. 1530.

 

(7)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (6)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (5)Mary Rice, b. 1675 (4)Matthew Rice, b. 1630-32 (3)Edmond Rice, b. 1594, (2)Margaret Baker, b. 1566, (1)Agnes Goldhop b. 1531.

 

(4))Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (3)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (2)Mary Rice, b. 1675 (1)Martha Lamson, b. 1633.

 

(5)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (4)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (3)Mary Rice, b. 1675 (2)Matthew Rice, b. 1630-32 (1)Thomasine Frost, b. 1600.

 

(7)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (6)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (5)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (4)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643. (3)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613. (2)William Hutchinson, b. 1586 (1)Edward Hutchinson, b.

 

(6)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (5)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (4)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (3)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (2)Katherine Hamby, (1)Robert Hamby.

 

(6)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (5)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (4)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (3)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (2)Katherine Hamby, (1)Elizabeth Arnold.

 

(11)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (10)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (9)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (8)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (7)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613 (6)Anne Marbury, b. 1591 (5)Francis Marbury, b. 1555 (4)William Marbury, b. 1524 (3)Robert Marbury, b. 1490 (2)William  Marbury, b. 1446 (1)John Marbury  b. 142?

 

(11)Sarah Dyer, (10)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (9)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (8)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (7)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (6)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (5)Francis Marbury, b. 1555  (4)William Marbury, b. 1524  (3)Robert Marbury, b. 1490 (2)William  Marbury, b. 1446  (1) Eleanor ___.

 

(15)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (14)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (13)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (12)Anne Hutchinson, (11)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (10)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (9)Francis Marbury, b. 1555 (8)William Marbury, b. 1524 (7)Robert Marbury, b. 1490  (6)Anne Blount, b. 1453 (5)Thomas Blount, b. 1414 (4) Thomas Blount, 1390 (3)Walter Blount, b. 1350 (2)Sir John De Blount b. 1298 (1) Walter Blount b. 1270.

 

(13)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (12)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (11)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (10)Anne Hutchinson, (9)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (8)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (7)Francis Marbury, b. 1555 (6)William Marbury, b. 1524 (5)Robert Marbury, b. 1490  (4)Anne Blount, b. 1453 (3)Thomas Blount, b. 1414 (2) Thomas Blount, 1390 (1) Sancha DeAyala 1360.

 

(12)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (11)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (10)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (9)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (8)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (7)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (6)Francis Marbury, b. 1555  (5)William Marbury, b. 1524  (4)Robert Marbury, b. 1490 (3)Anne Blount, b. 1453  (2)Thomas Blount, b. 1414 (1)Helena Byron.

 

(12)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (11)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (10)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (9)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (8)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (7)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (6)Francis Marbury, b. 1555  (5)William Marbury, b. 1524  (4)Robert Marbury, b. 1490 (3)Anne Blount, b. 1453  (2)Thomas Blount, b. 1414 (1) Margaret Gresley 1393.

 

(11)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (10)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (9)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (8)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (7)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (6)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (5)Francis Marbury, b. 1555 (4)William Marbury, b. 1524  (3)Robert Marbury, b. 1490  (2)Anne Blount, b. 1453  (1)Agnes Hawley b. 1432.

 

(9)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (8)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (7)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (6)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (5)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (4)Anne Marbury, (3)Francis Marbury, b. 1555  (2)William Marbury, b. 1524  (1)Katherine Williamson b. 1494.

 

(9)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (8)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (7)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (6)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (5)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (4)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (3)Francis Marbury, b. 1555  (2) Agnes Lenton, b. 1528  (1)John Lenton.

 

(9)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733 (8)Henry Dyer J r., b. 1693 (7)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (6)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (5)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (4)Anne Marbury, b. 1591 (3)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565 (2)John Dryden, b.1525 (1)David Dryden.

 

(10)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (9)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (8)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (7)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (6)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (5)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (4)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (3)John Dryden, b. 1525 (2) Isabel Nicholson, (1)William of Staffle Hill Nicholson.

 

(111)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (10)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (9)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (8)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (7)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (6)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (5)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (4)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (3)John Cope, b.1498 (2)William Cope, (1)Alexander Cope.

 

(12)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (11)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (10)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (9)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (8)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (7)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (6)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (5)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (4)John Cope, b.1498  (3) Jane Spencer,  (2)John Spencer II, (1)John Spencer.

 

(15)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (14)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (13)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (12)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (11)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (10)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (9)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (8)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (7)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506  (6)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465 (5)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (4)William Raleigh, b. 1420 (3)John Raleigh, 1382  (2) Thomas Raleigh, b. 1330  (1) John Raleigh b. 1310.

 

(10)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (9)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (8)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (7)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (6)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (5)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (4)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (3)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (2)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506  (1) Anne Chamberlayne b. 1475.

 

(13)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (12)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (11)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (10)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (9)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (8)Anne Marbury, b. 1591 (7)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565 (6)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (5)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (4)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (3)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (2)Margaret Verney, (1)Ralph Verney.

 

(14)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (13)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (12)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (11)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (10)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (9)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (8)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (7)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (6)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (5)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (4)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (3)Elizabeth Greene, (2)Thomas Greene II, b. 1400 (1)Thomas Greene b. 1369.

 

(15)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (14)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (13)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (12)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (11)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (10)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (9)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (8)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (7)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (6)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (5)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (4)Elizabeth Greene, (3)Thomas Greene II, b. 1400 (2)Mary Talbot 1383, Richard Talbot 1361, (1)Gilbert Talbot b. 1332.

 

(16)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (15)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (14)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (13)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (12)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (11)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (10)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565 (9)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (8)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (7)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (6)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (5)William Raleigh, (4)Elizabeth Greene, (3)Philippa de Ferrers,  b. 1393 (2)Robert de Ferrers, b. 1358 (1)John deferrers b. 1333.

 

(15)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (14)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (13)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (12)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (11)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (10)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (9)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565 (8)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (7)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (6)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (5)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (4)Elizabeth Greene, (3)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (2)Robert de Ferrers, b. 1358  (1)Elizabeth de Stafford.

 

(16)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (15)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (14)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (13)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (12)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (11)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (10)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (9)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (8)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (7)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (6)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (5)Elizabeth Greene, (4)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (3)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (2)Edward le Despenser II, b. 1335 (1)Edward le Despenser.

 

(16)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (15)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (14)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (13)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (12)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (11)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (10)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (9)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (8)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (7)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (6)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (5)Elizabeth Greene, (4)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (3)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366  (2)Edward le Despenser II, b. 1335 (1)Anne de Ferrers b. 1268.

 

(18)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (17)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (16)Henry Dyer Sr., (15)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (14)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (13)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (12)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (11)Elizabeth Cope, (10)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (9)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (8)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (7)Elizabeth Greene, (6)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (5)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (4)Elizabeth de Burghersh, b. 1342 (3)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (2)Bartholomew de Burghersh, (1)Robert de Burghersh.

 

(18)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (17)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (16)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (15)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (14)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (13)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (12)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (11)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529 (10)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (9)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (8)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (7)Elizabeth Greene, (6)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (5)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (4)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (3)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (2)Bartholomew de Burghersh, (1)Maud de Badlesmere.

 

(19)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (18)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (17)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (16)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (15)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (14)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (13)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565 (12)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (11)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (10)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (9)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (8)Elizabeth Greene, (7)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (6)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (5)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (4)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (3)Elizabeth  de Verdon, b. 1306 (2)Theobald de Verdon II, b. 1278 (1)Theobold de Verdon.

 

(20)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (19)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (18)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (17)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 Raleigh, b. 1506 (11)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (10)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (9)Elizabeth Greene, (8)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (7)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (6)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (5)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (4)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (3)Maud de Mortimer, b. 1286 (2)Edmund de Mortimer, b. 1252 (1)Roger de Mortimer b. 1231.

 

(20)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (19)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (18)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (17)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (16)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (15)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (14)Bridget Dryden, (13)Elizabeth Cope, (12)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (11)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (10)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (9)Elizabeth Greene, (8)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393 (7)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (6)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (5)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (4)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (3)Maud de Mortimer, (2)Edmund de Mortimer, (1)Maud de Braiose b. 1226.

 

(21)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (20)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (19)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (18)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (17)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (16)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (15)Bridget Dryden, (14)Elizabeth Cope, (13)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (12)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (11)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (10)Elizabeth Greene, (9)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393 (8)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (7)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (6)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (5)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (4)Maud de Mortimer,b. 1286 (3)Margaret de Feinnes,  b. 1262 (2)William de Feinnes, b. 1245 (1)Ingleram de Feinnes.

 

(21)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (20)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (19)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (18)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (17)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (16)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (15)Bridget Dryden, (14)Elizabeth Cope, (13)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (12)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (11)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (10)Elizabeth Greene, (9)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (8)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (7)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (6)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (5)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (4)Maud de Mortimer, (3)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262 (2)William de Feinnes, b. 1245 (1)Isabel De Conde, b. 1210.

 

(22)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (20)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (21)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (19)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (18)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (17)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (16)Bridget Dryden, (15)Elizabeth Cope, (14)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (13)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (12)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (11)Elizabeth Greene, (10)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (9)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (8)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (7)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (6)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (5)Maud de Mortimer, (4)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262  (3)Blanch de Brienne, (2)Jean de Brienne II, (1)Jean de Brienne.

 

(22)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (21)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (20)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676 (19)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (18)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (17)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (16)Bridget Dryden, (15)Elizabeth Cope, (14)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (13)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (12)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (11)Elizabeth Greene, (10)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (9)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (8)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (7)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (6)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (5)Maud de Mortimer, (4)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262  (3)Blanch de Brienne, (2)Jeanne diu Loir, (1)Gpffrey de Chateaudun, b. 1187.

 

(24)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (23)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (22)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (21)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (20)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (19)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (18)Bridget Dryden, (17)Elizabeth Cope, (16)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (15)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (14)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (13)Elizabeth Greene, (12)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (11)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (10)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (9)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (8)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (7)Maud de Mortimer, (6)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262  (5)Blanch de Brienne, (4)Jean de Brienne II, (3)Berengeria of Leon, (2)Alfonso IX Leon, (1)Fernado II Leon.

(25)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (24)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (23)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (22)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (21)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (20)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (19)Bridget Dryden, (18)Elizabeth Cope, (17)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (16)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (15)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (14)Elizabeth Greene, (13)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (12)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (11)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (10)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (9)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (8)Maud de Mortimer, (7)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262  (6)Blanch de Brienne, (5)Jean de Brienne II, (4)Berengeria of Leon,, (3)Berengaria of Castile, (2)Alfonso VIII of Castile, (1)Sancho III of Castile.

(26)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (25)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (24)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (23)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (22)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (21)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (20)Bridget Dryden, (19)Elizabeth Cope, (18)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (17)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (16)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (15)Elizabeth Greene, (14)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393 (13)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (12)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (11)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (10)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (9)Maud de Mortimer, (8)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262  (7)Blanch de Brienne, (6)Jean de Brienne II, (5)Berengeria of Leon,, (4)Berengaria of Castile,(3) Eleanor of England (2)Henry II Curt-Mantle, (1)Geoffrey le Plantagenet.

(26)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (25)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (24)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (23)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (22)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (21)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (20)Bridget Dryden, (19)Elizabeth Cope, (18)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (17)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (16)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (15)Elizabeth Greene, (14)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (13)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (12)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (11)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (10)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (9)Maud de Mortimer, (8)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262  (7)Blanch de Brienne, (6)Jean de Brienne II, (5)Berengeria of Leon,, (4)Berengaria of Castile,(3) Eleanor of England (2)Henry II Curt-Mantle, (1)Matilda of Aethelic.

(26)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (25)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (24)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (23)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (22)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (21)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (20)Bridget Dryden, (19)Elizabeth Cope, (18)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506 (17)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465  (16)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441 (15)Edward Raleigh, (14)Elizabeth Greene, (13)Philippa de Ferrers, b. 1393  (12)Margaret le Despenser, b. 1366 (11)Elizabeth de Burghersh, (10)Bartholomew de Burghersh II, (9)Elizabeth  de Verdon, (8)Maud de Mortimer, (7)Margaret de Feinnes, b. 1262  (6)Blanch de Brienne, (5)Jean de Brienne II, (4)Berengeria of Leon,, (3)Berengaria of Castile, (2)Alfonso VIII of Castile, (1)Blanche of Navarre.

 

(13)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (12)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (11)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (10)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (9)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (8)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (7)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (6)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (5)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506  (4)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465 (3)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (2)William Raleigh, b. 1420

(1) Idony Cotes Ford.

 

(14)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (13)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (12)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (11)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (10)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (9)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (8)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (7)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (6)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506  (5)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465 (4)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (3)William Raleigh, b. 1420 (2)John Raleigh, 1382 (1)Ang es Swinford, b. 1538.  

 

(15)Sarah Dyer, b. 1733  (14)Henry Dyer Jr., b. 1693 (13)Henry Dyer Sr., b. 1676  (112)Anne Hutchinson, b. 1643 (11)Capt. Edward Hutchinson, b. 1613  (10)Anne Marbury, b. 1591  (9)Bridget Dryden, b. 1565  (8)Elizabeth Cope, b. 1529  (7)Bridget Raleigh, b. 1506  (6)Edward Raleigh, b. 1465 (5)Edward Raleigh II, b. 1441  (4)William Raleigh, b. 1420 (3)John Raleigh, 1382  (2) Thomas Raleigh, b. 1330 (1)Rose Helion, b. 1315. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children of (602) Beriah and Elizabeth (Bliss) Sprague

 

(not in order of birth)

 

701. Anne, born July 6, 1783, in Whitingham, Vt.; married Aaron Rhodes.

 

702. Phineas, drown before 1828; married Sally Rhodes (a sister to Aaron), and had John and perhaps other children.

 

703. Samuel Bliss, born Jan 2, 1786 in Hartford, Washington County, N.Y.; died Mar10,1854, Fowler, St. Lawrence Co., NY, with burial in Gulf Cemetery, Fowler Twp., St. Lawrence Co., NY.  Married on Jan 26, 1807 in Harford, Washington Co., NY to Sibyl Jane Hall.  She was born Jan 27, 1790 and died Nov 17, 1859.  She was the daughter of Jonathan and Deodamia (Walker) Hall.  He was a shoemaker and trained all of his sons to that trade during their minority. In 1811, he moved from Hartford to Fowler, bringing his family and goods in ox-carts, and located on a farm one mile north of the present village of Little York, Fowler. The first town meeting was held Apr 14, 1816, at which he was elected Overseer of Highways.  He was honest, frugal, industrious, social, temperate and respected. His wife was a woman of strong intellect, rigidly just, industrious and a force in that community. He fought in the War of 1812, and later refused a pension.

In the United States Third Federal Census of New York in 1810, Saint Lawrence County had these named townships enumerated: Hopkinton, Stockholm, Madrid, Massena, Potsdam, Canton, Russel, Dekalb, Lisbon, Oswegotchie, and Cambray.

     “Cambray” became “Gouverneur” documented in several histories.  But the boundaries of these 1810 townships not known to me; do know these townships had to be large and that there were numerous boundary/name changes over the years to arrive at the township names/boundaries existing today.

     The 1810 census enumerated 7885 persons in Saint Lawrence.

     Town of Cambray had 223 persons and 44 heads of household.  The center of township population was probably where the village of Gouverneur sets today.

     1810 New York, Saint Lawrence County, Town of Cambray.  Microfilm Series M252, Roll 36, Page 25, records “Samuel B Sprague”, head of household, unambiguously, in the microform copy of the original census record.

     Census records a household eight persons:  two males under 10; two males 26-45; two females under 10 and two females 16-26.

     The name is indexed exactly by HeritageQuest Online.  No other Spragues are indexed by HeritageQuest in Saint Lawrence County in 1810.

     The record corroborates some facts and generates more question.

     If Samuel was born in 1786, he would not have attained 26 years of age during calendar year 1810.  It is possible Samuel was born before 1786 or that the wrong census record column was marked.  The two males 26-45 is not understood, but surely one of them is Samuel.

     If Samuel and Sybil were married in January 1807, and Sybil was born January 1790, and son Seth was born November 1807, then having four children under 10 by 1810 is feasible, but improbable.  More likely the dwelling contained other adult relatives or boarder with children.

     The census proves that Samuel Bliss Sprague arrived in Saint Lawrence in the year 1810 or prior.

     Saint Lawrence County was formed by legislation on Mar 3, 1802.  A village of Gouverneur history, period 1805-1890, claims settlement by four named pioneer families in the year 1806; they came from “Hartford, Washington County”.  By the spring of 1807 there were twelve named families in the settlement.

     Township of Gouverneur (now Cambray) was formed from Township of Oswegotchie on Apr 5, 1810.  The change was made because Gouverneur Morris owned much of the township lands.

     Township of Fowler was formed from Townships of Rossie and Russell on Apr 15, 1816.

     Census of 1850: (Samuel B. Sprague 64 M farmer $500, Sybil Sprague 60 F, Sybil Ferguson 21 F)

     Samuel Bliss Sprague served in War of 1812.  He served in 1814 from Whitehall, New York (formerly Skenesboro). He moved to St. Lawrence County, New York and founded the town of Fowler.

     From Cemetery records, Gulf Cemetery, Fowler New York:

Samuel B. Sprague died Mar 10, 1854 age 68 years 2 month 8 days. Settled in Fowler, Nov 15, 1811.

     On September 3rd, 2002 the grave marker for Samuel B. Sprague was observed to be broken in half.  The top half was slightly covered with sand but the name “Samuel B. Sprague” could be clearly discerned.  The bottom half was buried to a degree that it could not be observed without tools.

     “History of St. Lawrence And Franklin Counties”, page 301.

First Set of Town Officers….Simeon Hazleton, Samuel B. Sprague, overseers of highways;…

Ibid, page 302

Mr. Elijah Sackett, from Hartford, N.Y., came into town in 1808, and was employed as a miller, until his death, in the spring of 1812.  He was the first white person who is known to have died in town.  Lemuel Arnold, John Ryan, ____Cleveland, Ebenezer Parker, and others, came on and settled soon after, and in 1811, Samuel B. Sprague, made the first stand in the neighborhood of Little York.  Albin and Oliver Wright, were early settlers.  During the war several families left the country for fear of Indians, nor did the town begin to settle rapidly until 1820.  Early in 1818, Gen Haile moved into town with his family, having only come on himself, in the summer time previously.  He resided here till his death, Dec 17, 1821.

     From James Kallalll, note of Nov 15, 2004.

SAMUEL BLISS SPRAGUE:  family history manuscript created circa 1912.  A manuscript in cursive hand, pen and ink, forms part of a loose leaf family scrapbook and photo album once held by Clara Virginia Sprague (1903-1974).  The original manuscript is held by Stephany Gail Sprague Kallal in November 2004.  Physically the manuscript consists of four pages and several snippets of writing paper glued into the scrapbook paper. The hand is free and flowing; there are strikethroughs, insertions, and other emendations that would indicate this was a edited draft.  One page describes the purported “Sir Edward Spragge” coat of arms; this was not transcribed.  Three pages are devoted to biographical information for Samuel Bliss Sprague and one of his sons Chester Haden Sprague.  Manuscript sentences are long; these are transcribed as written; no change of punctuation or editing has been made by this transcriber.  No paragraph breaks have been added where the manuscript flows without any indication of such. But, editing and strikethroughs made in the original are incorporated into this transcription without transcriber comment.

 

() parenthetical marks are those that appear in the manuscript

[?] indicates that one or more characters or words missing or not legible to the transcriber

[sic] so, thus, exactly as observed, right or wrong; inserted by the transcriber

{ } comment by transcriber

…denotes the beginning and the end of content on each page and on each snippet of the original manuscript

 

…Samuel Bliss Sprague, grandfather of Don Fremont Sprague and others of the present generation of the Sprague family, moved from Hartford, Washington County, N.Y. about the year 181[?], and was one of the first two white men to settle in the town of Fowler, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. – the other being James {James is an amendation which appears to  be written by another hand} Haile who located  where Haileborough now stands and gave his name to [?] village which sprang up around him.  Mr Sprague located upon a farm about a mile {SFA records one mile north} from the present village of Little York and there not only cleared and developed his farm, but continued his trade as a shoemaker, in both occupations being assisted by his five sons, Seth, Chester, Jonathon, Obed and Beriah, while the daughters, Phoebe, Jane, Deiadama, and Sibyl [sic], aided their mother (Sibyl Hall Sprague) in the general household tasks, which, in that day, included all that housekeeping now requires, and, also {may be “alas”}, the arts of spinning, weaving, knitting, and the cutting and making all the garments for both sexes, and all by hand labor.  In fact, all that supplied this large family with food, and all other necessities and comforts, came from the farm itself and from the industry and skill of the members of the household.  Dressmakers, tailors, [?] liners, carpet weavers, carpenters and shoemakers, all were involved in that one home to meet the daily needs of the growing boys and girls, under the capable… …management and leadership of this early pioneer and his forceful and efficient helpmate.  Their old farm is now owned and operated by Byron Wight who… …married one of their great grand-daughter…

 

704. Daniel, married Emily _____

 

705. Beriah, settled near Lake Champlain and had a family of ten boys, but no girls. "Sprague's Regiment" in the Civil War was so named from the large number of Sprague in it from this locality.

706. Ichabod, born Aug 18, 1797.

 

707. Betsy,

 

(6) Elizabeth Bliss, b. 1757 (5) Samuel Bliss, b. 1731 (4) Samuel Bliss, b. 1699 (3) John Bliss, b. 1699 (2) John Bliss, b. 1639 (1)Thomas Bliss (1582)

 

(4)Elizabeth Bliss, (3) Samuel Bliss, (2) Samuel Bliss, (1) Anna Terry (1675)

 

4) Elizabeth Bliss, Samuel Bliss, (3) Samuel Bliss, (2) John Bliss, (1) Patience Burt (1645)

 

(6) Elizabeth Bliss, (5) Samuel Bliss, (4) Samuel Bliss, (3) John Bliss, (2) John Bliss, (1) Margaret Hulings (1595)

 

(7) Elizabeth Bliss, (6) Samuel Bliss, (5) Samuel Bliss, (4) John Bliss, (3) John Bliss, (2) Thomas Bliss, (1) Alice Smith

 

(2) Elizabeth Bliss, (1) Elizabeth Pineo (1738)

 

(5) Elizabeth Bliss, (4) Samuel Bliss, (3) Lydia Ticknor, b. 1702 (2) William Ticknor, (1) William Ticknor (1632)

 

(5) Elizabeth Bliss, (4)Samuel Bliss, (3) Lydia Ticknor, (2) William Ticknor,  (1) Hanna Stockbridge

 

(6) Elizabeth Bliss, (5) Samuel Bliss, (4) Lydia Ticknor, (3) William Ticknor, (2) Hanna Stockbridge, (1) John Stockbridge (1608)

 

 

(7) Elizabeth Bliss,(6) Samuel Bliss, (5) Lydia Ticknor,(4) Lydia Tilden, b. 1666 (3) Joseph Tilden, 1615  (2) Nathan Tilden, b. 1583  (1) Thomas Tilden (1532)

 

(5) Elizabeth Bliss, (4) Samuel Bliss, (3) Lydia Ticknor, (2) Lydia Tilden, (1) Elizabeth Alice Twisden (1633)

 

(6) Elizabeth Bliss,  (5) Samuel Bliss, (4) Lydia Ticknor, (3) Lydia Tilden, (2) Elizabeth Alice Twissden, (1) Susannah Stuppell (1595)

 

(6) Elizabeth Bliss, (5) Samuel Bliss, (4) Lydia Ticknor, (3) Lydia, (2) Joseph Tilden, (1) Lydia Hucstepe (1585)

 

(7)Elizabeth Bliss, (6) Samuel Bliss, (5) Lydia Ticknor, (4) Lydia, (3) Joseph, (2) Nathan Tilden, (1) Alice Biggs (1541)

 

 

 

Children of (703) Samuel Bliss and Sibyl Jane (Hall) Sprague

 

801. Seth, born Nov 26, 1807.

 

802. Jonathan Hall, married Electra Granger of Canada.

 

803. Chester Hayden, born May 21, 1812.

 

804. Beriah, married Maria Sweet; removed to Michigan.  His son Edward resides (1912) Pompeii, Michigan. Approximately 20 miles south of St Louis Mi.

 

806. Phebe, born May 5, 1820; died July 16, 1910, Milford Township, Defiance Co., Ohio; married Dec 6, 1840, at Fowler, New York to Lewis Cole, born Mar 31, 1820, at Fowler, died Nov 10, 1892. Children: Idra K., Seth R., Charles R., Lewis S., John E., Sarah D., Chester H., and Lincoln E. Cole.  Obed made visits to his sister I believe it was in the area around St Louis, MI.

 

807. Obed Hitchcock, farmer; Justice of the Peace: Methodist (Canada census of 1881, says that his Religion was Christian Brethren) Dec 14, 1822 Fowler, New York (near the town of Governeur), d. Nov 14, 1899 interred Pine River Cemetery Rudyard Township MI., he moved to Canada when quite a young man,  married in Darlington, Ontario on June 3, 1844 to Caroline Munson, b. Jul 14, 1822, Bastard Twp., Leeds Co., Ontario Canada.  Later they moved Osborne Township, Huron County, where she d. Jan 27, 1884. Caroline’s father was Warren Munson and her mother was Ann (Brezee, Bresee, Berzee) Munson, b. Sep, 24, 1796, d. Aug, 11, 1866. they were Baptist.  Ann (Brezee’s) Munson’s father was Capt. Peter Brezee from Rutland Co., Vt. and  maybe was a Baptist (There are several individuals with this sir name buried in the Philipsville Baptist Cemetery).  Laura (Sprague) Harper wrote a letter on June 8, 1924.  She claims that, “Brezee was from France and that he met and married an Odel in Vermont.” (Likely this is incorrect as a Lucy Odell married Jared Munson who was Warren’s father.)  She says that, “Ann was the second child of twelve, and that when Ann's mother died her father married a widow with six children and had six more children with the widow Jones.”  She goes on to say, “they lived on a large farm and raised all their own provisions and manufactured most of their own cloth.  Hired shoemakers by the week and a tailor the same way. Only went to market about twice a year.  Manufactured their own sugar, molasses syrup, raised their own flax and made their own linen, sheared their own sheep and made yarn and cloth. Great-grandmother superintending the spinning and weaving. It must have been a great life." There are many inconsistencies in the letter but the letter is a typed copy and this could be the problem. Brezee it would appear was a Captain and maybe a Baptist at the time of the American Revolution. If he was from France it certainly lends itself to some interesting speculation. Was he a French Huguenot?  Did he come during or before the war? I continue to do research on this man but the parts to this puzzle  seem to come together very slowly.

 

          Why did Obed at such a young age travel thirty miles to the St. Lawrence River, cross over into Canada, travel up the St Lawrence some two hundred thirty miles to Darlington Ont.?  Caroline (Munson) Sprague moved from Leeds County Ont. To Darlington in about 1831 when she was about nine years old.  Leeds is just across the river with Fowler being about thirty miles inland on the NY side.  She was six months older than Obed.  Did the families know each other?  They got married when both were 21.  They did not move to Huron Twp near Exeter Ont. until 1851 or 1852.  I don’t have any idea how long they courted but he certainly could not have had a lot of money.  He did however have a skill, that of shoemaker.  Did he go to work for Warren Munson?  They proceeded to have three children before moving on to Huron Twp Ont. where they built a farm. I have pictures of the old barn and remains of the old yellow brick home.  Eva (Sprague) Taylor (1007) visited the old farm some time around 1910.  Meeting several cousins for the first time. They opened up their home to them and they stayed several days.  She was quite impressed with the warm welcome that they received. She was unable to identify the individual relatives that she had met.

 

808. Deodamia, born June 26; married  Jonathan Fraker

 

809. Sibyl, born Nov 9, 1828.

 

810.  Jane, born 1816.

 

(2) Sibyl Jane Hall, b. 1785-90, (1) Jonathan Hall.

 

(2) Sibyl Jane Hall, b. 1785-90, (1) Deodamia Walker.

 

 

Children of (807) Obed Hitchcock and Caroline (Munson) Sprague

 

901.  Ann, b. Sep 2, 1845; m. Jan 1868, James Handford.

 

902.  Aaron, b. Oct 12, 1847; d. Jun 22, 1862.

 

903.  Theodore, (Sep 1851-1914) and Prudence Banes (1858-1928) were married in Exeter, Ontario, in 1875. They settled in Strongville, Michigan in 1880.

 

904.  Nicholas Breeze, b. Oct 8, 1854; blue eyes, dark brown hair, m. May 1880, Ann Jane, daughter of John and Margaret (she had a twin sister) (Johnson) Smyth, b. Mar 22, 1858, light blue eyes, reddish golden hair.  He died Sep 16, 1942, age 87 years 11 months 12 days. She died Sep 2, 1889, age 31 years 5 months 11 days. He had dark brown hair falling below his shoulders and was often taken for an Indian. She had long curly, golden red hair.  Married Angie Elizabeth Kirkpatrick (Widow) daughter of William and Charity (Eastman) Fraser in Dollarville, MI on Jul 12, 1893.  She died Dec 13, 1927, 70 years 11 months 12 days in Pentland Township, MI, (Thrombosis), and interred Cottle Cemetery Pickford MI.

 

905. Charles Munson, b. Jul 15, 1858: d. Jul 9, 1867

 

906. Clarence, b. Aug 17, 1860; m. Jun 1882, Mary, daughter of William Stewart; resident Windsor, Ontario

 

907. Laura, b. Apr 11, 1865; m. Sep 26, 1888 James F. Harper; resident Newberry, Michigan, d. Aug 1945.

 

 

(8) Caroline Munson, b. 1822 (7) Warren Munson, b. 1788 (6) Jared Munson, b. 1760-62 (5) Jared Munson, b. 1742     (4) Ephriam Munson, b. 1714 (3) Joseph Munson, b. 1676  (2) Samuel Munson, 1643  (1) Capt. Thomas Munson, b. 1612.

 

(8) Caroline Munson, (7) Warren Munson, (6) Jared Munson, (5) Jared Munson, (4) Ephriam Munson, (3) Joseph Munson, (2) Samuel Munson, (1) Joanne Unknown, b. 1610.

 

(11) Caroline Munson, (10) Warren Munson, (9) Jared Munson, (8) Jared Munson, (7) Ephriam Munson, (6) Joseph Munson, (5) Martha Bradley, b. 1648  (4) William Bradley, b. 1619 (3) Sir William Bradley, b. 158?, (2) William Bradley, b. 1569, (1) William Bradley, b. 1543.

 

(9) Caroline Munson, (8) Warren Munson, (7) Jared Munson, (6) Jared Munson, (5) Ephriam Munson, (4) Joseph Munson, (3) Martha Bradley, (2) Alice Prichard, b. 1625 (1) Roger Prichard.

 

(7) Caroline Munson, (6) Warren Munson, (5) Jared Munson, (4) Jared Munson, (3) Ephriam Munson, (2) Margary Hitchcock, b. 1681 (1) John Hitchcock, b. 1654.

 

(11) Caroline Munson, (10) Warren Munson, (9) Jared Munson, (8) Jared Munson, (7) Ephriam Munson,(6) Margary Hitchcock, (5) Abigail Merriman, b. 1654 (4) Nathaniel Merriman, b. 1613 (3)George Merriman, b. 1559  (2) Gregory Merriman, b. 1535  (1) Thomas Merriman, b. 1510.

 

(9) Caroline Munson, (8) Warren Munson(7) Jared Munson (6) Jared Munson, (5) Comfort Curtis, b.1716  (4) Nathaniel Curtis, b. 1677  (3) Thomas Curtis, b. 1648 (2) William Curtis, b. 1592  (1) John Curtis, 1577.

 

(9) Caroline Munson, (8) Warren Munson, (7) Jared Munson, (6) Jared Munson, (5) Comfort Curtis, (4) Nathaniel Curtis, (3) Thomas Curtis, (2) William Curtis, (1) Elizabeth Hutchins.

 

(11 )Caroline Munson, (10 )Warren Munson, (9)Jared Munson, (8)Jared Munson, (7)Comfort Curtis, (6)Nathaniel Curtis, (5)Mary Merriman, b.1657  (4)Nathaniel Merriman, (3 )George Merriman, (2 )Gregory Merriman, (1)Thomas Merriman.

 

(11)Caroline Munson, (10)Warren, (9)Jared, (8)Jared, (7)Comfort Curtis, (6)Nathaniel Curtis, (5)Mary Merriman, (4)Nathaniel Merriman, (3)George Merriman, (2)Gregory Merriman, (1)Mary Ring.

 

(9)Caroline Munson, (8)Warren Munson, (7)Jared Munson, (6)Jared Munson, (5)Comfort Curtis, (4)Nathaniel Curtis, (3)Mary Merriman, (2)Joan Lines, b. 1628  (1)John Lynes, b. 1590.

 

(8) Caroline Munson, (7) Warren Munson, (6) Jared Munson, (5) Jared Munson, (4) Comfort Curtis, (3) Sarah Hall, b.1681  (2)David Hall, b. 1652 (1) John Hall, b.1605-10.

 

(10 )Caroline Munson, (9 )Warren Munson, (8 )Jared Munson, ( 7)Jared Munson, (6 )Comfort Curtis, (5 )Sarah Hall, (4) David Hall, (3)Jane Woolen, b. 1622  (2)Edward  Woolen, b. 1585-89. (1)John Woolen, 1550.

 

(10 )Caroline Munson, (9 )Warren Munson, (8 )Jared Munson, ( 7)Jared Munson, (6 )Comfort Curtis, (5 )Sarah Hall, (4) David Hall, (3)Jane Woolen, (2)Edward Woolen, (1)Isabel Harding.

 

(7)Caroline Munson, (6 )Warren Munson, (5 )Jared Munson, ( 4)Jared Munson, (3)Comfort Curtis, (2 )Sarah Hall. 1681  (1)Sarah Rockwell.

 

(9)Caroline Munson, (8)Warren Munson, (7)Jared Munson, ( 6)Jared Munson, (5)Comfort Curtis, (4)Sarah Hall, (3)Sarah Rockwell, (2)Esther Huggins, (1)John Huggins, b. 1617.

 

(9)Caroline Munson, (8)Warren Munson, (7)Jared Munson, ( 6)Jared Munson, (5)Comfort Curtis, (4)Sarah Hall, (3)Sarah Rockwell, (2)Esther Huggins, (1)Bridget Green, b. 1621.

 

(10)Caroline Munson, (9) Warren Munson, (8) Jared Munson, (7) Anorah Hale, b. 1742 (6) Joseph Hale, 1710 (5)Timothy Hale, b. 1667 (4)Timothy Hale, b. 1641 (3 )John Heald, b. 1610  (2) James Heald, b. 1565 (1) Johannes Heald, b.1547.

 

(8)Caroline Munson, (7) Warren Munson, (6) Jared Munson, (5) Anorah Hale, b. 1742 (4) Joseph Hale, 1710 (3)Timothy Hale, b. 1667 (2)Timothy Hale, b. 1641, (1) Dorothy Royle b. 1515.

 

(7)Caroline Munson, (6) Warren Munson, (5) Jared Munson, (4) Anorah Hale, (3) Joseph Hale, (2 )Timothy Hale, (1)Sarah Barber, b. 1646.

 

(6)Caroline Munson, (5) Warren Munson (4) Jared Munson, (3) Anorah Hale, (2) Joseph Hale, (1) Hannah Barber, b. 1682.

 

(6)Caroline Munson, (5) Warren Munson, (4) Jared Munson, (3) Anorah Hale, (2)Mercy Gillett, b. 1710  (1) Benjamin Gillet, 1680.

 

 (8)Caroline Munson Munson (7) Warren Munson, (6) Jared Munson, (5) Anorah Hale, (4)Mercy Gillett, (3)Elizabeth Austin, b. 1684 (2 )Anthony Austin, b. 1636  (1 ) Richard Austin, b. 1610.

 

(8)Caroline Munson, (7) Warren Munson, (6) Jared Munson, (5) Anorah Hale, (4)Mercy Gillett, (3)Elizabeth Austin,          (2)Anthony Austin, (1) Elizabeth  Unknown.

 

(9)Caroline Munson, (8) Warren Munson, (7) Jared Munson, (6) Anorah Hale, (5) Joseph Hale, (4)Timothy Hale,  (3)Timothy Hale, (2)John Heald,  (1)Elizabeth Hill, b. 1572.

 

(3) Caroline Munson, (2) Ann Brezee, (1) Capt. Peter Brezee.  (Brezee, Bresee, Berzee)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Mrs. Theodore Sprague, Sister in-law to Nicholas B. Sprague

 

     Forty-two years ago this spring we came from Ontario, Canada. It was in 1880, the year before President Garfield was assassinated.

     We intended to purchase a farm near the Soo; but owing to some uncertainty about the title we did not locate there as we had intended.

     Hearing that there was land for sale thirty miles to the west along the old Mackinaw Road, my husband decided to go out and inspect it. As the land pleased him and the water was abundant, he decided to settle here.

     Leaving me in the Soo, he went down the old trail to the Point, as St.Ignace was called, and took train to Cheboygan where Judson D. Smith, the owner of the land, was living at that time. He purchased a lot of one hundred and sixty acres, which lay about half a mile back from the trail and tree miles east from the Pine River. After a space had been cleared and a log cabin built and roofed with tamarack boards, I came down from the Soo to my new home. I shall never forget that ride. It was the month  of April. We stayed over night at King's old house, eighteen miles out. The owner was a Frenchman. The house was a long, low log building and on this particular night it was full of people. Every bed was occupied and folks were sleeping all about the floors. We did, however, manage to get a little space for ourselves and were mighty glad to get away as soon as dawn broke next morning.

     From this point onward the road was in bad shape, the mud holes in places were twelve feet across and sometimes five or more feet deep.

     Time and time again the horses had to be unhitched and chains fastened to the tongue of the wagon to get it out of the mud.

     After five miles of this kind of travel we struck the corduroy and to our dismay found that the heavy rains had washed away most of the logs. For a little way the horses walked the stringers and then we had to wait several hours until the men cut down poles to make the road safe for the wagon to pass over.

Weary in mind and worn out in body, I reached at length what was to be my home for many months to come.

     I will not describe the loneliness of the life in those days for that may better be imagined than described. However we had a shelter and that meant a great deal. The life of the settler in those days was wild and full of difficulty. In the summer the mosquitoes were so numerous that they would settle so thickly over a horse that the animal would be literally covered and one could not put the tip of one's little finger upon a bare place on the animal's hide.

In winter the snow lay so deeply in the woods and clearings that they were impassable, and woe betide the traveler unfortunate enough to be lost in those snow laden fastness.                                                                                                     

     One night in the fall shortly after we came out here, the lamps were lighted and my husband and I and the children were just about to partake of our evening meal when there came a knock at the door.

     It was storming heavily without and when the door was opened two lumberjacks were standing there. They asked for shelter and I invited them to come inside. They sat down with us at the table and I noticed that one of them seemed unable to control himself,

he was trembling all over as with an ague. His companion told us that he had, had a long spell of drinking and that he was suffering from delirium tremens.

     Early the nest morning they took the trail and we thought no more of the matter.

     Just a few months afterwards, Nick Sprague, who came out to us in the fall of 1880, was hauling in a load of wood when right in front of his lot he found the body of a man lying face downward on the ground with a hole in the back of his head just behind the ear.

     Turning him over Nick recognized him as the man who had been crazy with delirium tremens.

     We never knew how he had come to his dreadful end. It was clearly a case of murder, for the hole in his head had been caused by the stab of a jack-knife.

     They dug a grave and buried him right there in the forest on the place now owned by Mr. John Wallis.

     Down and out without a friend to shed a tear or bewail his fate, they lowered him in a rough casket made of pine lumber and there he sleeps today in his nameless grave.

     Nature took his poor broken body to her kindly breast and the wind sobbed a requiem among the branches of the tall spruce trees and his soul with all its faults and sins was received back again into the arms of the Everlasting Mercy.

 

 

Told by (1013) Barney (B.W.) Sprague to (1205) Eric (D.E.) Sprague

     Nick used to carry mail on foot from Sault Ste. Marie to St Ignace, Michigan on the old Macinac Trail.  Barney told how he always paid cash for his food and lodging.  On one winter evening in St Ignace being low on cash he went to the store where he usually did business and tried to buy food for his trip back to the Sault.  Unable to have credit extended to him he reminded the man that other men bought everything on credit but that he had always used cash. Barney used this story to explain to me why you

should establish credit but that I should never abuse it. Needless to say Nick walked back to the Sault without food.

     Nick was an expert barn framer and cabinet maker.  In those days the timbers were hand hewn with an axe. He also worked in the woods where he would dig out the stumps of large tamarack trees and using his axe hew the root and upper part of the tree so it could be used for the bow of the large wooden ships.  This was a fine art for which he was an expert.

     Nick was a tough old bird who sometimes would rather fight than eat. On one celebration day in Exeter Ontario he took part in a fight in which he and his

opponent were put into a barn and they fought for six hours. When the fight was over he had two of his fingers nearly chewed off. When he was 87 years old he attended a 4th of July celebration in Newberry Michigan where he ran and won the old men’s race.  After the race he spotted another old man across the street that he did not like and had to be restrained by Barney in order to keep him from going after the man.

     Ann Jane died in 1889, Windsor Ontario, Barney being four years and four months old.  He could only remember looking up into a beautiful loving face. We know that her hair was red like his and that his two oldest children had this same type of red hair. She was born in Biddulph Township in Huron county Ontario.  She had a brother William John, and Johnson. William John had three children Frank, Ethel and Edgar. Frank had two children Borden and Irene. Ethel had Percy, Clifford, Doughty, Margaret, Shirley, Fred, Glenn, and Anna. Edgar had Howard and he had Donny and Doug who live in Midland Ontario. Borden had Beverly and Joan. Irene had Douglas and Ingrid. Ann Jane was the daughter of John and Margaret (Johnson) Smyth.  Barney and Frank Smyth who were first cousins, and close to each other.  They always said that John Smyth's family came from Belfast Ireland, and that the Smyth clan was from the area around Belfast. John was Orange Irish and I have pictures of the church and churchyard that he is buried in.  He donated the land for the church and gave money for its construction. There is a plaque inside of the church stating that he is the only person buried in the churchyard.  The church is a Church of England of which he was never a member.  All we know about Ann’s mother is that she had a twin sister.

 

 

NICHOLAS B. SPRAGUE, of Rudyard, Mich., interviewed Feb 20, 1942

at his home.

 

     Mr. Sprague states he was born in Osborne Township, Huron Co., Ontario, Oct 4, 1854. His father, Obed H. and mother, Caroline (Munson) Sprague were of English descent and from northern N.Y. State. Mother had some French blood. Four children older than Nicholas, lived in Huron County with remainder of family.

     Nicholas came to Sault, Ontario on Steamer "Quebec" in 1877, with Simon Parker, early resident of Chippewa Co., but had not met before boarding the steamer. Parker came to Michigan side and Sprague spent a few weeks on Canadian side in Kora and at Goulais River where he remained a couple of weeks with family named "Tilley" of 2 or 3 boys and 2 or 3 girls, but Sprague was in search of land for farming and finding none suitable returned to Huron Co..

     He came to Sault, Michigan again on June 26, 1880, from Goderich, Ontario. Does not recall what steamer or who was master says father, Obed H., and brother, Theodore, had preceded him in 1879, settling at Strongville, on the Mackinaw Road, which was the half-way station between Sault and St. Ignace. Theodore had the place at the corner or Half-Way place and now owned by Wallace, and Nicholas took the next farm north. At this time there was no person lived west of Pickford except Theodore and Nicholas Sprague, Thomas Bains, brother of Theodore's wife, and James Holt, whose great-grand child is Ben Tamblyn, of Sault, Mich. These were the first settlers in Rudyard Township which was later formed from part of Pickford and Trout Lake townships.

     At Pickford was a small store owned by C.W. Pickford, and a man named Garby whose farm was just across the line on the lot later owned by Ephriam Palmer, and no one living between Pickford and Strongville.

     Nicholas and Theodore each had a team of horses and both teams were sent the winter of 1880-1881 to work in the woods on Drummond Island for George Dawson, Sault lumberman. Jim Rye drove Theodore's team and Bill Emerson drove Nick's, and both teams returned in March, 1881, so as not to be caught on the island, Emerson lived with the family of Richard Smith 6 miles West of Pickford.  In spring of 1881, Nick and his team with Bill Kilby as boss, logged out the Palm Station Road from Dick Smith's corner to a point west, which was four miles east of the D.S.S.& A. Ry. station then called Palm Station, later named Kenneth. At this time the Mackinaw Road had been graded only from the Sault to a point seven miles out. Judson D. Smith and Ken McKay had gotten a grant of land for grading this road to Strongville, but there was some crooked work and it was claimed what the inspector was brought out only a few miles from the Sault,

was told that the road had all been graded, and approved this job before it was completed.

     Nicholas Sprague does not know when Rudyard township was organized, who were the first officials, etc. but recalls that the first school was at Strongville which point was at Chicken Rick Rapids on the Pine River, and church was first held in this school. He cannot recall who first teacher was, but an early teacher was a one-legged man named "McGinnis", and an early preacher was named Homststock, of Kinross, who married Mary Hombroff.

     Judson D. Smith put in a steam sawmill at Strongville but Nick cannot state what year. The machinery was brought by vessel to St.Ignace and hauled over the Mackinaw road by Nick and others making Rabbit's Back (5 miles out of St.Ignace) the first day, and Pine River Crossing (9 miles south of Strongville) the next. Bob Goslin was running the station there where people stopped overnight.

     Nicholas sold his Strongville land to Mr. Davidson, father of W.E. Davidson and had bought another farm, which he sold to Fred Wallace, of Strongville (1/2 mile south) for $4.50 per acre. He later bought a house and lot in Rudyard now opposite the Presbyterian Church. N.L. Field had been cashier of a bank somewhere and came to Rudyard and started the first store, and Theodore

Sprague clerked for Field.  Nicholas worked in the copper country 4 years and

 

 

ran a boarding car for the DSS&A Ry. for 4 years for a man named Mc Lean, having 8 boarders on contract to board them.

     When he came to Sault Jas. Lipsett had been there one year. Francis Lessard was Sheriff and Water St. and Plank Alley alone had business places. Late Alex Cadette who lives on the hill just out of Sault, took a group of Indians to England & married a white woman there.

     He remembers that there was an archway over Plank Alley in one place.

     While walking from Sault, out Mackinaw road to Strongville, it was getting dark when he got to the huckleberry marsh four miles north of Strongville and he heard wolves howling. They came nearer and he became frightened as there appeared to be many, all coming his way. Soon he saw a buck deer running easily ahead of the wolves which numbered 13 or 14, but the buck headed toward the Munuskon River only two miles distant and would easily escape because, once the buck was in the water he would stand and bat each wolf on the head with a front paw, just as fast as they could come up with the buck.

     Nicholas got uneasy once in the early days at Strongville and started out to see what lay beyond home. He got up and came out of the woods after dark on the shore of Waiskey bay. Wandering along the shore he came to the hut of an Indian, and approached the latter with the butt of his rifle extended toward the red man in token of friendship. As neither could talk to the other they soon stopped trying. The Indian pointed to some bags, etc., in a corner and Nicholas stayed there overnight after partaking of some beavertail soup. in the morning they still could not converse nor make each other understand by signs until Nicholas, looking at the sun to get his direction, and mentioned "Miniskon" and "Mackinaw Trail", the Indian understood that this was Strongville where Nick lived, when the Indian made some signs telling how Nick could reach that point. The Munuskon River heads at the farm of Wm. Colwell, near Rudyard.

     Nicholas says that some years later he worked in the roads at Allenville and Andy Hutton used to come there with horses from the Sault, coming via Palm Station Road. This was about 1883. He says he framed all the telegraph poles along the Soo Line Ry. from a point 7 miles SW. of Sault to Manistique, under Jack Stack, foreman, of St.Ignace. This was about 1888.

     In Canada he had as a lad cut off the heavy timber from land for the regular price of $3.00 per acre. When aged 17 he bought Walker's Best whiskey for 25 cents per gallon, and anyone could "treat the house" anytime, regardless of the number of drinkers, for 25 cents. This was the custom in that part of Ontario. When aged 17 he worked as a regular brakeman on the Grand Trunk Ry. from Sarnia to Stratford. When 18 or 19 he drove the mail stage operated by a big Irishman named Hawkchaw in opposition to the outlaw Donnelly’s between Exeter and London, a four day trip, delivering mail at all stations en route. Got along fine with the Donnelley boys and their drivers, even exchanging mail and

 

 

 

passengers when one had too many and the other could handle extra load.

Received $40.00 per month for this when the normal wage was $10.00 per month, because he got on so well with the opposition.

     Nick also worked in the woods getting out square timber in Huron County, with a huge Frenchman and his gang, all French except Nicholas. The Frenchman was an expert at "Hacking"(cutting the outside of the log just to the line of square timber) while Nick was expert at "blocking", (cutting off the hacked part right up to the line. He followed this for three winters with this Frenchman and his crew until he left for Sault, Michigan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children of (904) Nicholas Breeze and Ann Jane (Smyth) Sprague

 

1010.     Baby boy, born and died about 1881 (Barney or Charles) interred on farm.

 

1011.     Baby boy, born and died about 1882 (Barney or Charles) interred on farm.

 

1012.  Baby boy, born and died about 1883, interred Allenville Cemetery, MI.

 

1013.  Wesley Oscar, but known as Barney or B.W., b. Apr 16, 1885  Born at Strongville, Michigan in a log cabin one mile north of M-48, near Jack Wallis farm; d. Mar 1969; m. Jun 3, 1908, to Isabelle Dorothy Meier daughter of Abraham and Isabel (MacMillan) Meier. She was b. Sep 19, 1891, d. Apr 21, 1961. He was educated at Strongville School, Hancock, and 1905-1906 at Ferris Institute in Big Rapids, Mich..

 

(8) Ann Jane Smyth b. 1858, (1) John Smyth.

 

(2) Ann Jane Smyth b. 1858, (1) Margaret Johnson.

 

Children of (904) Nicholas Brezee and Angie Elizabeth (Fraser) Sprague

 

1014.     Baby boy, born Jul 9, 1896, died Jul 16, 1896 in Rudyard Township, MI, interred Cottle Cemetery Pickford, MI.  (Stone says 1897, this is not consistent with death record at court house, death was registered on Jan 7, 1897)  However, it is possible that another baby was born in 1897.

 

Isabelle Dorothy (Meier) Sprague as told to (1205) D.E. Sprague

 

     She was born in Shallow Lake Ont., the oldest of four children. Her father like many others came to Michigan to work in the woods. They were working over in the Ozark area which is about 25 miles southwest of Rudyard Michigan when in the spring of the year 1900 her mother died leaving four small children with grandmother being eight years old. She told me how they brought her mother out to Rudyard when she became very ill. It was spring and the breakup was under way with lots of snow, ice, water and mud. The icy water reached the horses bellies, and it was one cold, wet and sad trip.  Reaching Rudyard they would travel another mile East to reach the farm of relatives. When her mother died they would travel back to Rudyard and then proceed three miles South to the Pine River Cemetery. The grave had been dug but it was full of water and the only way to put the casket down was to sink it with rocks. (I went to this Cemetery in about 1953 with my grandmother and her sisters but they could not agree as to the exact burial site.) Shortly thereafter the children were sent back to Canada to live with relatives. The children were separated and placed into the

 

homes of different relatives. Her father remained in Michigan but missed his

children very much. He brought his children back to Michigan building a small log cabin within a mile north of the old train station on the Pine River. (As a teenager we used to toboggan on the hills around this old homestead with there being remnants of the old building still present.) Grandma being the oldest had to grow up very quickly. She cooked, washed, cleaned the house and directed the younger children.  They drank the river water and she caught Typhoid fever. This would plague her years later causing her to have an enlarged heart. She met my grandfather and married at sixteen years of age. They made their home in Rudyard Michigan first in the west end of town near the Pine river and latter on the east end of town in a large red brick home. She had four children and then came the heart problem. Many trips were made to Mayo Brothers in Minn.. She was unable to climb stairs or walk very far. A sleeping porch was built and she spent her summers out on the porch. From here she was able to run her rooming house which she had started after her children were grown. My father built a cabin several miles out of town for my grandparents. My mother and dad would take them there on Sundays during the summer and fall which in itself holds many memories for me. Grandma in the last ten years of her life had pretty much overcome her heart problem but then she become ill with cancer. We made several trips where we would bundle her up in the back seat of our car and off to Mayo Brothers Clinic we would go. She was in much pain but she would not complain and was willing to undergo any new treatment that was available. The doctors told her to drink a little wine in order to settle her stomach and of course she did not drink alcohol. In all of her pain we laughed and made jokes all the way from Minn. to Mich. about her wine bottle.

 

     She always wrote to me every week when I was in the Pacific and prayed daily for my welfare. She was a person that could keep things inside and bear up gracefully under bad circumstances. Once when my plane made an unscheduled landing at Hickham Field in Hawaii she heard it on the radio and did not tell my parents until after she knew I was safe. I spent many pleasant hours with her talking about the early days in Rudyard and Canada. She always saw herself as having come from poor but hard working stock. It made her day when about ten years before her death, on a trip back to Canada, she found out that she was related to the first Prime Minister and architect of the Canadian government (MacDonald) was one of her ancestors. She lived to meet my wife-to-be, and before she passed away she said we would have ten kids we didn't.

     Isabelle was the daughter of Abraham and Isabel (MacMillian) Meier. Abraham was born Feb 25, 1866 in Scott Twp. Ont.; m. Jul 12, 1890; d. May 3, 1936; burial Flake Cemetery Southeast of Barryton, Mich.. He was a son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Ulrach) Meier. Isabel was born Jun 1870; d. Apr 11, 1900; burial three miles south of Rudyard Mich.. She was a daughter of Dougal and ______ (Mac Phail) MacMillan.

 

 

The following information taken from interviews and a trip made

to Canada by D.E. and N.A. Sprague.

 

     I took a picture of what appears to be a baptismal certificate of Elizabeth D. (Ulrich) Meier. It bears the date Feb 9, 1831. On her tombstone which is located approximately one mile north of Shallow Lake, Ont.. I transcribed the following. (Age 64 years 6 days Nov 12, 1899). This would make her date of birth Nov 6, 1835.  This would make her 17 years of age in 1852 when she came from Switzerland to Canada.

     From my interview with Ruby White a granddaughter of Elizabeth D. (Ulrich) Meier. "Grandma Meier went back to Switzerland to settle her parent’s estate. The reason she came over here was because her father was hard on them, he owned a vineyard. Grandma was weaker then the other sister so she came over." I would like to point out that there will appear to be inconsistency. This is because people remember the past in many different ways and we have the job of figuring out the reality of it all.

     From my interview with Mary Foster a granddaughter of Solomon and Elizabeth Meier. She says that "Abe Meier (son of Solomon and Elizabeth) always said that the name was spelled MEIER on all the boxes that came from Switzerland out to Canada. Some descendants later changed the spelling to Meyer." Elizabeth's father owned a stage line in Switzerland as well as vineyards. The stage used to travel to a large hotel in the mountains which was owned by her uncle, but it is unknown whether it was her father or her mothers’ brother. When her father died her mother remarried. Her step father was nasty and hard on the children so Elizabeth and her brother came to Canada. The brother did not have a family and is buried somewhere in northern Michigan. Elizabeth and Solomon were likely married in Markham Ont.. She went back to Switzerland when daughter Mary was twelve years old. Her mother was still living. They did not speak English when they came over but later on in life they did not speak broken English. They would speak German to each other and to their children at times. The children did speak some German as a result. Solomon had two brothers Henry and John. Their descendants live in the area around Markham, Ont.. They may spell their name Meyer. One sister and one brother did not come over to Canada. They were not Mennonite but a lot like them. They used to go down to Listral for camp meetings. They did not dress as Mennonites. Solomon was killed by a hit and run cutter when going for milk. He was very much against drinking.

     From my interview with Carmon Rourk a grandson of Solomon Meier he said, "grandfather always brought candy for the kids." Solomon's father was in the Switzerland Army.  Solomon used to tell how the children shined the buttons on his father’s uniforms. Solomon was married in Markham near Toronto Ont.. He never had a serious illness and was seldom sick. He would walk from Park Head to Owen Sound after he was 80 years old (approximately 16 miles) He used to say he grew 16 inches after he left Switzerland. He had five children: (1) George, who was said not to be a full brother to the other children (no real explanation, this just wasn't talked about) (2) Mary (3) Abe (4) Halda (5) Dave.

 

Harvey Rourke says that Solomon broke his hip when he was 50 or 60.

 

     Ruby White of Park Head Ont. has the Pewter plate that Solomon Meier used on board ship when he came from Switzerland to Canada. The year was 1852 and he was sixteen years old. The trip by ship lasted nine weeks. He was born Nov 25, 1836 and died Feb 13, 1921, this was taken from tombstone in cemetery approximately one mile north of Shallow Lake Ont.. From my interview with Ruby White, "I can see him in my mind I recon every apple he peeled did that way he went around, around, around he had the whole thing ya know and there wouldn't be any apple on the skin he was very save--he very much like my mother I am bad at some thing, there wouldn't be no apple on it but it wasn't apart. But maybe he'd give us a chunk of it he was awful good to us kids ya

know." Ruby goes on to say, "Solomon was a farmer, he was always poor. Everybody run him. (took him) (to easy going) could sell him anything. Mary his daughter took him in where he had a good home in his old age." It should be noted that the home that he was taken into was owned by Solomon. For a man described as poor he owned his own farm and home. He walked with a cane as he got older and Ruby says this came as the result of a tree falling on him when he was a young man clearing his land. He has been described as a man who complained very little about the hardships he had to endure. Ruby does tell how he got fed up with eating turnips three times a day. He was a very plain man, easy to get along with. His favorite expression when mad or disgusted was "Bouter on it".

 

     Solomon and Elizabeth did come to Canada on the same ship. Was she pregnant when she boarded the ship? Did this happen during the nine week trip? They were both very young and maybe we will never know but what we do know is that George would never be considered a total and complete member of the family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE WRITTEN BY B.W. SPRAGUE ABOUT HIS CABIN 10 MILES SOUTH OF RUDYARD MICHIGAN ON OLD US-2.

 

My cabin is 12X20 it has 4 windows and door deer horns as you enter with a horse shoe on the door situated on a 4 1/2 acre plot on good old U.S. 2 ten miles from Rudyard and 33 from Soo a little creek runs through it with a garden spot on the lot there is cedar birch and pine spruce & balsam to there is an oil lamp to see by and out door plumbing to a home comfort range to cook on and wooden benches for two so when you have some time and nothing else to do just drop by and see me the same as others do.

 

MEMORIES OF WESLEY OSCAR SPRAGUE BETTER KNOWN AS BARNEY OR B.W.

                           COLLECTED BY D. ERIC SPRAGUE

 

1.   Nick B. placed Barney with the Haydens after his mother died.  N.B. would have been working in the woods with his horses and unable to care for a young child. The Haydens were close friends and the fact that they were Catholic was not an obstacle.  During this time there would not have been a church so priest traveled.  Barney always spoke highly of the priest that would stay over at the Hayden home.  He held this family in high regard and established a lifetime relationship with them, which spanned three generations.  The next generation of Haydens lived in Rochester Minnesota and often when Barney took Grandma to the Mayo Brothers Clinic they would stay in their home.  I had the privilege to stay in their home.  They had a beautiful dark haired daughter my age that drew pictures as the Doctors performed surgery.

          I believe that the relationship with the Haydens is major reason why he was so tolerant of Catholics at a time and in a community that was not tolerant.  He would not allow in his home or from his family disrespect for the Catholic members of our community.  Catholics have personally approached me in this community with demonstrations of appreciation for the attitudes and actions taken by the Sprague family during its many years of living in the community.

 

2.   When Barney was young there was an incident with a Spruce Hen. The story goes that they lived out in Strongville and his father and stepmother were gone somewhere leaving him in the cabin with his Grandfather Obed.  A muzzleloader loaded with shot was always kept hanging above the fireplace. It was always keep loaded with instructions that Barney was not allowed to touch it as Nick thought him to young.  Anyway this old Spruce Hen landed in a tree outside and Barney wanted to get the gun down and shoot it. Obed told him no that his dad didn’t want him to shoot that gun. Barney begged and Obed gave in. The gun came down and Barney went out to shoot the bird. Of course we know how stupid Spruce Hens are and Barney got to close raised the gun took aim squeezed the trigger and all there was, was a cloud of feathers.  The gun was reloaded by Obed and placed back where it belonged. Barney cleaned up outside the best that he could.  When Nick got home he did notice some feathers and made some mention as to where they could have come. If Obed did tell Nick, and he likely did, it was never mentioned to Barney, but he said that he had learned his lesson on that day.

       When he was a young boy attending school in Strongville they would carry their lunch to school.  Critermans had an orchard on the south slope of the mountain, which would be south of Strongvile.  He craved fresh fruit so much that he would trade his lunch for an apple. At this time with transportation being what it was there was a shortage of fresh fruit and this was quite a treat.

 

3.     Barney attended Ferris at Big Rapids. It has been said that he picked up his beautiful handwriting skills at this institution.  I don’t know at what age that he started to box, but he had gained some proficiency prior to attending Ferris. He always told me that there was someone that was better with the gloves then yourself. In relating a story from the Ferris days he told how the guys wanted him to box this other fellow, but Barney had reservations as he new that the other guy had a lot more training. The match took place and he said that he learned when a man should stand up or sit down, and this was one of the times that he should have sat down.  Barney came to the defense of a schoolmate named Parker who was being picked on.  Parker would be in charge of the Masonic home in Alma, MI.  Years later he would visit the Sprague home and take them on site seeing activities in the area.

     He was a very good amateur boxer who enjoyed the sport. He instructed his sons in the art, and what I learned was from my father.  There did come a time when Barney was sparing with my father Nick A., that Nick B. told Barney that the time had come to discontinue this activity. I am still not sure who was about to get hurt.

 

4.  He worked for N.L. Field for more than 20 years.  Traveling to Chicago as buyer for Field buying items that would sell in the type of community that he lived.  It is my understanding that Field often wanted items that would not sell, and he also took items off the orders.

 

5.  Barney told the story how he had a cheap hat that would not sell so he doubled its price and it sold the next day.  He did like nice clothing and it was said that he bought suits, and vest on trips to Chicago.

 

6.  Grandpa married my grandmother when he was twenty-three.  He would have been working for Field at this time.  Their first home was on the west end of Rudyard, south of the RR tracks, on the north bank of the Pine River.  On one fine day Barney was trying to be helpful with their first child, and took over the job of washing diapers.  In the past he had observed the women completing this task, and felt that he understood the process.  He commenced the procedure by bringing a tub of water to a fine boil.  Next, he added soap and all of the diapers.  It was at this point that Aunt Prudence came in finding Barney dutifully stirring the boiling diapers.  She took one look at the boiling diapers, and explained to Barney that the diapers needed to be rinsed out prior to washing them.  This incident gave the family lots of laughs never letting him forget it.

 

6.     He hunted deer when the limit was five, but there were very few deer.   This would have been prior to the many forest fires that swept through northern Michigan. The mature forest did not provide the food necessary to maintain a large population of deer.  He told stories of warm Novembers when he would sit while hunting deer and go to sleep.

  

7.      He seems to have tolerated his stepmother.  He never spoke ill of her but would say that it is hard for a stepmother to establish a good relationship with a stepchild.  He lived with his father and stepmother traveling with them to Hancock where N.B. worked for the Rail Road.  She cooked for the work crews. He went to school in Hancock and told how he carried pails of beer to the men for a penny per pail.

 

8.  Barney never owned or drove a car.  He walked to work each day coming home for lunch and always taking a nap before going back to work. When I was about twelve years old I heard about pens that had multi color ink.  I decided to go down to the CO-OP store to ask Grandpa if he had such a pen.  He said, “sure he had pens that would write any color that I wanted.”  He took me over to the pens and selected one.  Next, he proceeded to write the words red and then green.  He said,  “see it will write any color that you want.”

 

9.     Grandpa spoke French, Dutch, Ojibwa, some Gaelic, and Finish (fluently).  Working in the store required that he had to communicate with the public, and many ethnic groups represented this community with Finish being dominant.  I don’t know the name of the itinerant man but he taught the man English and that man taught him Finnish.

 

 10.     Barney liked to draw natural scenes with a variety of wildlife such as deer, ducks, and trees.  He did not have any formal training but he did purchase books that demonstrated techniques.  His drawings were done in pencil and ink.  He did this for relaxation and his own entertainment.  He characterized his work as simply doodling but it demonstrated his innate artistic ability.

      His artistic ability came out in so many other ways.  His hand completed the advertisement signs in the store.  He taught the Palmer method primarily to adults during the evenings.  The ABC’s placed on the black board in Caroline (Sprague) Oats classroom was in beautiful scrip placed there by his hand. The signs painted for MacGinnis after his retirement attest to his ability. His appreciation for poetry,

and the natural state of things came through in his personality. He was famous for picking up old twisted and deformed trees and making walking sticks or other conversational objects out of them.

 

11.  It seems as if N.A. and a local deputy sheriff may have shot a deer out of

season. These were depression times and the meat had been cut up and given to several of the neighbors. Grandma Sprague had even canned some of it.  The game warden some how got word of it, but could not get anybody to talk. My guess is that too many people had some of the meat. At any rate he came to our house finding my mother home alone, and demanded to search our home. Mother let him come in thinking that there was not any venison in the house. Meantime word got down the street, and Grandma had Aaron put the canned venison out in a creek behind the house.  The game warden did not find any venison in our house but he did find a deer hair on one of my dad’s boots out on the back porch.  This was enough for him and he issued a citation.  If he had looked in the kettle on the stove he would have found some real evidence.  Aaron says that he put the venison in the creek and remembers retrieving it later.  Meantime dad went to court, and had to pay a fine. The deputy lost his job over this, which does not say much for due process of the law in the 1930’s.  The real irony is that a short time later the community needed a deputy, and my dad was selected for the job.

 

12.     I do not know when he became God conscious but he certainly had high respect for the Priest that visited the Hayden family. He raised his family in the Presbyterian Church, and I was baptized as a little Presbyterian.  At some point in his adult life this was not enough, and he and Charlie Taylor (married to Eva Sprague) would attend what is now the Rudyard Bible church on Sunday evenings. Grandma was too sick to walk to the Presbyterian Church plus it had steep steps leading up into the church. He told me how he would stop and pray at the Bible church when it was closed. In 1947 when my father and mother returned to Rudyard we all attended the Presbyterian Church. I think Barney felt that any church he could get my dad into was likely a good thing.

     In Aug of 1949 many things changed as my father became a Christian, and we all started to attend the Bible Church.  Barney believed that your walk and talk should be the same and while this is ok it caused him to question the concept of eternal security.  He and my grandmother believed in the power of prayer and spent hours in this endeavor praying for their children and grandchildren.

     During the period of life that his children were growing up the church had many stringent ideas as to how to keep the Sabbath holy.  He worked six days a week and Sunday was a day for church, and for him being with his family.  He did not have any problem with taking his son’s hunting on Sunday afternoon. This caused many of the good people to find fault in his actions but he stood firm on this issue.

 

13.     In 1958 I extended my tour of duty in Asia so that I could match my return with my brothers wedding, which just happen to by my grandparents golden wedding anniversary.  There was allot of activity taking place that summer and as the family gathered at the Dowd home we were eating and making merry.  In the back yard there was a steel bar between two-cedar posts.  People were having fun showing off as to how many pull ups they could do. Barney said he could do that and proceeded not to just do pull ups but to do chin-ups. I was nineteen at the time and in pretty good shape and this certainly impressed me that my seventy three-year-old grandfather was doing chin ups along with other acrobatic tumbling activities that he enjoyed doing.

 

14.     He stated that he could pass on his pure blood.  I am not too sure what he meant by this but when he was at Mayo Brothers Clinic they had indicated to him that his blood was pure.

 

15.     It is my understanding that the chicken coup was converted into a cabin for Nick B. to live in.  N.B. lived in the cabin and took his meals in the main house. Barney kept a small garden off the south end of the cabin where he grew vegetables and a few potatoes.  There were a few apple trees behind the garden.  I can remember as a young boy that in the fall he would burn leaves back there, and would roast apples in the fire. It was fun and a nice treat.  As time went on he kept a garden at the cabin out on Macinac Trail.  This was a little larger with a variety of vegetables and potatoes.

     In the front yard next to the sleeping porch there was an apple tree that provided large beautiful Northern Spy apples. Grandma Sprague always said it grew as a result of the kids throwing their apple cores there. The apples having come in wooden barrels from N.B. Sprague’s farm each fall.   All that I know is that they sure were good. 

 

16.     It was Partridge hunting that he really enjoyed during the years of my growing up. He tried to take his two weeks of vacation during Partridge season spending as much time as he could at the cabin. He always kidded me about shooting all of the Partridge before the season opened. I didn’t do this, and always tried to convince him but never was quite sure if he believed me or not.

 

17.     The year after my grandmothers death, and during the time that my mother went back to finish her degree, and prior to my marriage we lived together.  I was in the Air Force at the time stationed at Kincheloe. He did the cooking, and bragged that we did not eat hamburger, not even once. I would take him to the base commissary where he was completely entertained. His background in the grocery business left him amazed at how low the prices were, and they were but they were artificially low to benefit military personnel.

     We had a great time but he was not one to normally talk allot as he said it is better to be silent and have people think that you are a fool then to speak and remove all doubt. He did not drive a car so this left him alone all of the time that I was at work. This resulted with little choice but to talk with me. He spent time imparting his great wisdom gleaned from many years of listening.  He made me understand that education was one thing that once you had it nobody could take it away from you. The Air Force was at this time paying for classes that I was taking at Michigan Tech. I was less then happy about it but he encouraged me to continue. He was still alive when the Air Force paid for me to attend the University of Colorado and then later prior to his death I was at Michigan State.

     I told him how lucky I had been with promotions in the Air Force as compared to some other people that he new.  He told me that, “luck is not necessarily the reason you are Eric and not those other people.”   He said,  “loyalty, knowing what was expected, learning the skills for the job, and a willingness to work hard are major ingredients to success.”

     On marriage and the military, he was not impressed. He felt that long separations were not a good idea. He felt that being in the military was an honorable profession but separation was inherent in this profession and one should expect this to be a fact of life.  He lived to see me leave the active military and within days after his passing I informed the Air Force that they no longer would need to fly into Lansing to pick me up. They told me that I could not quit like this, but nobody ever came for me and I finished my degree at MSU.

 

18.   Our family moved back to Rudyard from Sandusky in 1947.  My dad and brother moved north during the early summer with mother and myself coming in October.  I had spotted a neat knife at Orr’s hardware in Sandusky and begged my mother to let me buy it with some money that I had saved.  Mother had relented allowing me to make the purchase.  I truly loved that knife and showed it off to everybody that I would meet.  When we arrived in Rudyard I had to show my grandfather.  This was a big mistake.  Grandpa figured it was too much knife for a nine year old.  He sat me down on the front steps and explained this to me and promptly traded me a puny little knife for my knife.  Of course I took this up with my parents but to no avail.  Today I am sure that a lot was going on behind the scene but it fell to grandpa to deal with me.

 

19.     Frank Sprague was a first cousin to Barney.  Frank was a barber in Rudyard with his shop in the back of the Anderson store.  Saturday night was the time that farmers and people working in the woods came to town.  Barney would work until 10 or 11 P.M. in the store and then head down to Frank’s.  Men would be lined up to talk and get their weekly shave in preparation for Sunday.  Barney would lather them up and Frank would shave them.  They would sometimes work until 2:00 A.M..  A shave and a haircut cost two bits (twenty-five cents) in those days but I don’t know how much a shave cost.  Barney was able to make as much money on a Saturday night as he normally made in two or three days at the store.

     Barney learned how to cut hair from Frank, and he cut his son’s hair.  He cut my hair from the time that I was nine until I left home in 1956.  I figured that he did a better job then the local barber.  I take that back I know that he cut hair better then Wes Tilson our town barber.

 

20.     Barney purchased a large mounted buck head from a Finish man.  I think the mans name was Sarinen but I am not positive.  My dad introduced me to that mans son during the Rudyard days held during Rudyard centennial. 

 

This mount hung in the Red Brick house for years but in the late 1940’s it had deteriorated.  It was at this time that the antlers were cut off from the head.

 

The antlers were kept in the basement where would go to play with the old RCA victrola.  I remember running my fingers over the long tines and the numerous smaller ones. I cannot remember the total number but it had in excess of 20 points.  This rack had a huge spread and would certainly qualify as one of the largest racks coming from Michigan.  Sometime around 1960 Aunt Elsie took the rack back to Washington D.C..  The last time that I saw this rack was in Washington D.C. in 1970.

 

21.     Harry Yiers lived a couple of blocks from the Red Brick home. He always seemed like an old man to me but in 1947 he was still digging wells.  His son Barney was childhood friend of my dads and that friendship lasted through their adult life with their daughter being a close friend of mine through high school and until my return from Asia in 1958.  Harry was also a fine craftsman who made violins that he kept on display in a glass cabinet as you entered his home.  In the late 1920’s he owned a Model A Ford and on Sunday afternoons he would take the Sprague family for long rides.  This was done with the expected flat tires.  This was taken in stride with everyone piling out taking time to patch the tire and then proceeding on.  In those days this could occur two or three times on a Sunday afternoon drive.

 

22.     Jim Sprague tells the story of having a foot race with Barney.  This took place in 1961 when Jim would have bee n 17 and Barney 76.  They raced from the Red Brick house to the CO-OP store with Barney winning the race.  

 

23.     Jim tells the story of bringing firecrackers with him to grandma and Grandpa Sprague’s.  It seems that Jim and a friend blew the door off an old stove and grandma had gotten word of it. His firecrackers disappeared and he looked high and low for them but all of his efforts failed.  Nobody seemed to know what had become of the firecrackers.  They did not make their appearance known until grandpa took the trash out to be burned.  Grandpa started to burn the trash and all of a sudden the trash began to explode sending burning trash all over the place.  It would seem that grandma had disposed of the goods by placing them in the trash.

 

24.     Aaron tells that on certain Saturday nights that he would meet his dad after work.  Barney would cut a muskmelon in half and they would head to Levi Olmsteads drug store.  Levi would place a large scoop of vanilla ice cream in each half of the muskmelon and they would sit down enjoying this delicious treat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children of (1013) Wesley Oscar (Barney) and Isabel Dorothy

(Meier) Sprague

 

1101.  Elsie Belle, b. Dec 16, 1908; married in Summer or Fall of 1932.  She married Raphael John Higgins, born Oct 23, 1912.  Elsie graduated from Alma College, MI on Jun 7, 1931, taught in the Public Schools in Washington, D.C. for two years as an Annual Substitute.  She taught, daily, classes that were problems while the teachers went to the Model schools to observe teaching methods.  She began teaching at St. Anthony’s Elementary School in the Fall of 1951.  She was the second lay teacher in the Parochial school system of the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C..  In 1958 she began teaching 8th grade science at Little Flower Parochial school where she taught until June of 1970.  She died of cancer on Mar 11, 1971.  She is interred at Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Silver Spring, Md. 

     Elsie and Ray moved to Washington, D.C. in summer of 1937.  Ray worked for the Government Printing Office.  His first job was as an elevator operator.  When he retired he was an Air Conditioning Engineer and head of Maintenance for the GPO.  He died on Oct 29, 1998.  He is interred at Gate of Heaven Cemetery with Elsie Belle and with his second wife, Margo whom he married in 1972.  His 3rd wife, Margaret, survives him.

 

1102.  Nicholas Abraham b. Jan 18, 1910 in Rudyard Michigan; d.  Aug 13, 1996 m. Jul 14, 1931 in Sandusky, Michigan to Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. Jul 10, 1909, in Custer Township, Sanilac County, Michigan, d. May 28, 1984, at home ten miles South of Rudyard, Michigan on Macinac Trail; interred: North Rudyard Cemetery. After attending Alma College Nick had a variety of work experiences. They included retail lumber, highway construction, lumbering and mill operator, and a stint in the Merchant Marines during WWII (United States Coast Guard Certificate, serial number E516826, Book number 290924, Seaman. Ruth attended Sandusky Elementary School, Sandusky High School, and Alma College and graduated from Eastern Michigan University. She was a school teacher in Rudyard Community Schools for sixteen years retiring in 1973. She was a member of Grace Bible Church, Eastern Star, Michigan Education Association.

     Nick and Ruth first made their home in Rudyard Michigan where their oldest son was born in 1932. They returned to Sandusky, Michigan where they lived in the home of Ruth's birth. Their second son was born in 1938 in the same room that Ruth was born. In 1947 the family moved back to Rudyard, Michigan. During the fall of 1950 the family moved ten miles south of Rudyard, Michigan on Mackinac Trail. The land was cleared and a home built. Ruth passed away in 1984 and Nick lived alone in this home until he passed away in 1996.

 

 

1103.  Donald Munson, b. Sep 24, 1912. Named after his Uncle William Donald Meier. Attended Alma College. married Mildred who was born February 16, 1910; died Aug 2, 1993; interred Lakeview Cemetery Escanaba, Michigan

 

1104.  Aaron B., b. Nov 17, 1916. Graduated from Rudyard High School in 1935 and attended Central Michigan University.  He moved to Rochester Minn. in 1936 where he worked in the Rochester State Hospital.  He m. Phyllis Johnston and their daughter Jane Ann was born Jul 1940.  They moved to Sandusky, Mi in 1942 where he worked for the State Highway Department until he enlisted in the Army in 1943.  Serving with the United States Army in Europe during WWII, with the 67th  Armored Regiment 2nd Armored Division.  Phyllis and Jane Ann moved to Rudyard and lived in the cabin behind B.W. Sprague’s home.  Jim was born on Jun 14, 1944 and when Aaron was discharged from the Army in the spring of 1945 they moved back to Sandusky.  Aaron helped care for A.K. Moore during this time and he and his family moved to Detroit in the fall of 1945.  He worked for the House of Lamps, and then for Ford Motors.  He retired from Ford in 1981.

m. Betty Jo Card on Jul 22, 1955, b. Jun 24, 1920.  Daughter of Edger Card and Laura J. Hendricks b. April 5, 1883, d. May 26, 1972 with interment in Grand Lawn Cemetery Detroit, Michigan.

 

(3)Isabelle Dorothy Meier, (2)Abraham Meier, (1)Solomon Meier.

(3)Isabelle Dorothy Meier,(2)Abraham Meier, (3)Elizabeth Ulrach.

(3)Isabelle Dorothy Meier, (2)Isabelle MacMillan, (1)Dougal MacMillan.

(3)Isabelle Dorothy Meier, (2)Isabelle MacMillan, (1)_____ MacPhail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicholas Abraham Sprague (1102) as told to Elaine Sprague in about 1993.

 

          Grandpa Nicholas Brezee Sprague lived in a small cabin behind the brick home on Rudyard’s Main Street where Isabelle and Barney Sprague lived.  N.B.’s father Obadiah had helped to organize Rudyard Township.  Nick went to Mackinac Island at age 2—his Grandpa Nick worked on the railroad out of St. Ignace.  Don Sprague has Barney’s diary about accounts—bills, houses where they lived, nurses for the kids, etc.

          Abraham Meier (father of Florence, Isabelle, Annie and Bill) lived in a house beyond the ravine north of the Rudyard train depot—he had a sale and sold his cattle.  Grandpa Nick Sprague bought his cattle and drove them back to Newberry.  Grandpa Abe also owned the 40 acres where Turner-Howson School is now located.  Uncle Bill burned his feet once by running across the field just after it had been burned off.  Abe Meier worked at the brickyard.

          Grandpa Nick Sprague owned a farm west of Newberry.  Nick spent summers on the farm as soon as he was old enough.  He rode on the train to Trout Lake and to the South Shore junction—and then to Newberry.  Grandpa Nick would be at the station to meet them with the wagon.  Grandpa Nick’s wife (Ann Jane Smyth) died—and Barney’s three brothers died.  N.B. later married Angie Fraser—they had one boy who died young—so Barney had three full brothers and one half-brother and he was the only one of the family of five to survive to adulthood.  N.B. and Angie reared several foster children.  They always had lots of company at their home.  N.B. sent back barrels of apples to Rudyard in the fall for Barney’s family.

          One Christmas when they were all ready to go to Newberry Elsie got sick and the whole family had to stay home.  What a disappointment!  Barney never had a car.  Isabelle became ill with a heart murmur in the early 1930’s—she often slept on a sleeping porch built on the west side of the front porch of the brick house.  Dr. Ferguson operated on Barney for appendicitis—where Kivela’s house was next door to the brick house—Sprague’s lived there at the time.  Aaron was born at a house on main street later owned by George Kooyer.  Grandpa Nick built the house across from the Presbyterian Church. Nick and Elsie were born in the Holland house, near the Pine River south of the railroad tracks.  Don was born in the Kivela house.  Sprague’s also lived up above Dorie Sprague’s store.  Grandpa Nick was the Santa Claus one Christmas when they lived at the Kivela (McCormick) house.

Newberry used to be called “celery city”—Spragues had a celery garden.  They had a lake below the Newberry farm—the men cut ice blocks in the winter and stored it and had ice all summer.  Nick had an orchard and cider press.  Aunt Laura’s husband Jim Harper was the cobbler at the State Hospital.  He paid the $1,000 tuition for Aunt Elsie’s last year at Alma College when Barney ran out of money.  Mr. Harper was a great Christian and church leader—he would have all the kids kneel in a circle to pray—sometimes they got the giggles.

     Nick went to school in the building that was later the Rudyard Creamery (bank site) now after both parts of it were built.  It became too crowded and they had to have classes in Dorie Sprague’s store (downstairs).  Barney’s family had lived upstairs there earlier.  In the early teens, Dorie built the house later lived in by Chris Peterson’s family and by Charlie and Eva Taylor.

     Nick graduated from high school in 1930—went to Alma College in 30/31.  He and Ruth were married in 1931.  Keith was born in 1932—Nick worked in Rudyard Cloverland Oil, then went to Sandusky in the fall of 32.  He worked at the lumber yard and also did WPA work.  They stayed in Sandusky until 1947.  He worked for Miller Brass.  During the war he worked for GM Diesel and Copco Steel.  He worked on the Great Lakes boats in the summer—he sailed out of Ashtabula, Ohio, and sailed up to Houghton-Hancock.  He was a coal-coal-carrier and then a fireman.  He got tired of shoveling coal—he got off the boat at Hancock—he called home and they wired him some money—and he went back to Croswell on the bus.  He then worked for Jensen Bridge and Supply.  Keith and Nick came to Rudyard in the summer of 1947, and Ruth and Eric came that fall—they lived in a house owned by Cecil Beacom.  Nick worked for Beacom—and also worked on his own, painting inside and doing plastering.  He built his own house ten miles south of Rudyard in 1949-50.  The family lived in Barney and Isabelle’s cabin next door while working on the house.  He built the family room several years later.

 

Ruth Sprague (Moore) by (1205) D.E. Sprague

 

      Mother graduated from Sandusky High School. Next she entered Eastern Michigan University for one year and transferred to Alma College for two more years. She told how when she first went away to college her father gave her a check book, and she promptly signed all of the checks to save time when writing out a check. One of her sisters on a visit noticed this and told her this was not a good idea. In later years she was able to look back and laugh about this incident.

     It was at Alma College that she met my father. Her roommate was Elsie Sprague my father’s sister. Mother, dad and Elsie would hitch hike up to Barryton Michigan where dad's Uncle Bill and Grandfather Meier lived. Bill lived on a farm with his father Abraham Meier.

      My first memories of my mother are in Sandusky MI. where we lived in a two story white wood frame home on the north end of town.  When I was a baby mother worked in a dry goods store owned by Mr. McPherson and later kept books in the Sandusky lumber yard which was owned by her father. The yard was south of our home about a half mile. We had a live in lady who was with me during the day. This allowed mother to get out of the home to work.

     She was active in community affairs and was an outstanding vocal soloist. She was also active in the Eastern Star and was Worthy Matron being installed by her father who was the Grand Master of the Masonic Lodge.

     She was twenty-nine years old when I was born. I was born in the same room of the same house, and rocked in the same crib.  Adjoining our home were eighty acres of woods and farm land including an old barn and out buildings. She would walk with me as a child through the woods and fields pointing out the different flowers, trees and wild life. In the fall of the year our entire family, parents, grand parents, aunts and cousins would pick mushrooms and then come back home for a huge mushroom fry along with the Pheasant which my father would shoot.

     Once my parents purchased a male and female Mallard ducks.   The hen laid her blue eggs under a rose bush next to our house. When the eggs hatched mother took me out to look at the babies.  Within an hour of their hatching the hen took her ducklings to the drainage ditch near our house for their first swim.

     We had several dogs at different times. I remember the time  when my brother Keith grabbed the chain and the dog pulled the chain through his hands laying his hands wide open. My mother who  was a woman of action and not one to put off the inevitable had the farmer next door take the dog to the woods and shot it.

     Mother was a strong person, and in many ways far ahead of her time. One of the things I remember was that if I did something wrong she never said wait until your father gets home.  She instilled in her children a strong sense of right and wrong along with good value system from a very early age.

     When I would come home after being in a fight she would not  encourage me to fight, but nor would she tell me to let people walk on me. She understood that I must grow up to be strong in a  harsh world. She taught me to respect authority and not damage another person’s property.

     She and her mother before her were very pro American and pro  military. During the war years (WWII) when my mother heard my prayers the American soldiers and the Japanese soldier were always remembered. I was given a wonderful understanding of what  a soldiers duties were even if they were not ours. War was the business of the citizen on both sides and one must respond to their governments bidding. Our country was always right of course  but this did not make the enemies soldiers evil just their

government.

      Dads work took him away for a large part of the war years and as a result my mother was left with the children. These years must have been hard with the rationing and so on but we came out of this with a strong sense of family and community. 

     With the war but a bad memory my dad left for Upper Michigan in the summer of 1947 and we soon followed that fall. We lived on  a farm just south of Rudyard Michigan where mother made the best of a bad situation. As a kid I enjoyed the animals and harsh

winters but mother must have felt trapped as the pace of life was very slow. We walked allot in those days as it was hard to find a car to buy after the war.  This meant that mother had to walk to town for groceries and carry them home. Dad finally found a 1947 Plymouth in late 1948 and this helped a great deal.  In 1950 my parents decided to build a new home ten miles south of Rudyard Michigan. We cleared the land by hand with the help of lots of dynamite. During the time dad was building our new home the family moved into a one room cabin.

     It was during this time that the Korean War broke out. My brother enlisted and we all went to the train station to see him off. I was with mother when she received the letter from my brother indicating that he had received his orders for overseas. It is the only time that I can remember seeing her cry. It took her about two minutes to regain her composure and she said God would take care of him. I was twelve years old so for the next three years I can remember being mad that I was too young and that this one was going to get away without me. I knew then that I would enlist when I was old enough and I did.

     Dad built a beautiful new home for us. We were now in the middle of the wilderness and hunting became a way of life for me. Mother adapted well to this new life and often said she would never trade it for life in Sandusky. This was hard for her mother and sisters to understand. I actually believe she enjoyed it when we would have venison spread out across the kitchen as we butchered it. I think my dad may have been one of the best shots that I have ever known. He would shoot partridge, woodcock and ducks in the air and along with our share of venison we always had plenty of meat. Rabbits were also plentiful but dad would not  eat rabbit. He said it was like eating a cat. I snared and shot rabbits but we always gave them away.

    Safety was very important to my dad and he required me to hunt with a single shot 22 rifle, or shotgun with hammer which had to be carried broken open. He said this would give me plenty of time to know exactly what I was shooting at. This certainly didn't slow me down as I shot plenty of birds, ducks, rabbits and deer.

     My turn would come to join the service in 1956 three days after I finished high school and I would remain there until 1969.

     After I left home mother decided to teach school and did so for the next sixteen years retiring in 1973. During that time she finished her degree at Eastern Michigan University. She taught school in Rudyard Michigan where my brother would later become Principal. My brother after Korea attended Western Michigan University where he received his BA and MA degree.

     When I got out of the service in 1969 I attended Michigan State University and received my BA and later my MA from Eastern Michigan University with additional Postgraduate work at Eastern Michigan and Michigan State University.  Thus a cycle was completed in that for four straight generations we have attended institutions of higher learning. All of the children in the fifth generation have now attended Universities.

     My mother enjoyed several years of retirement with my father during which time they were able to travel. My mother was able to see her sons all graduate from College with advanced degrees and several of her grand children attend Universities.

     She died from colon cancer on Memorial Day 1984 three years after her 50th wedding anniversary. Ironically her father had passed away on memorial day 1947.

 

 

Nicholas Abraham Sprague (1102)

 

     Born Jan 18, 1910 in Rudyard, Michigan. Graduated from Rudyard High School in 1930. Attended Alma College on a basketball scholarship. At Alma he was introduced to his sister’s roommate, Ruth Elizabeth Moore. They would marry on Tuesday afternoon, July 14, 1931 in Sandusky, Michigan.  His work experience would include retail lumber, tree trimmer, truck driver, cement finisher, block layer, factory worker, carpenter, painter, plasterer, highway construction, sailing and lumbering.

 

1.  Thornton Brothers Road construction (US-2)

2.  Cloverland Oil.  Delivered bulk oil.

3.  Painter. Nov 1932 Sandusky Mi. (depression) painted Spring 1933. Farm labor (Corbishley) 15.00 per month or .50 each day, milked 10 cows by hand morning and night. Moved from old home on 116 W Sanilac to N. Elk. Cecil McAuley family lived with Sprague family during depression.

4. Winter 1933. Shoveled coal Moore & Carter and worked W.P.A. painting the Court House.

5. Moved to upstairs apartment 1934. Started work at Moore & Carter 1942.

6. Spring 1942 worked Mueller Brass in Port Huron.

7. Worked State Highway department 1943.

8. G.M. Diesel, Detroit.

9. CAPCO Steel Detroit.

10. Sailing on the Great Lakes.

11. Hudson Body, Detroit.

12. Edison Tree Trimmer.

13. Cement Finishing Summer 1946-1947.

14. Carpenter, Bacom 1947.

15. Plastering, Cornwell 1949.

16. Carpenter, Kinross AFB 1950.

17. Plastering, Cornwell 1951-1960.

18. Road Construction 1961-1962.

19. Lumbering 1963-1983.                                          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE BLUE AND THE GRAY

BY RUTH MOORE

1927 or 1928

 

     I do not stand up in this presence to indulge in any mock sentimentality. You brave men who wore the gray would be the first  to hold me or any other son of the North in just contempt if I should say that I thought the North was wrong and the result of  the war was a mistake, and that I was prepared to suppress my political opinions. I believe most profoundly that the war on our side was eternally right, that our victory was the salvation of the country, and that the results of the war were of infinite benefit to both North and South. But, however we differed, or still differ, as to the causes for which we fought then, we accept them as settled, commit them to history, and fight over them no more. To the men who fought the battles of the Confederacy we hold out our hands freely, frankly, and gladly. To courage and faith wherever shown we bow in homage with uncovered heads. We respect and honor the gallantry and valor of the brave men who fought against us, and who gave their lives and shed their blood in defense of what they believed to be right. We rejoice that the famous general whose name is borne upon your

banner was one of the greatest soldiers of modern times, because it exists already. Differ in politics and in a thousand other ways, we must and shall in all good nature, but let us never differ with each other on sectional or state lines, by race or creed..

     We welcome you, soldiers of Virginia, as others more eloquent than I have said, to New England. We welcome you to old Massachusetts. We welcome you to Boston and to Faneuil Hall. In your presence here, and at the sound of your voices beneath this historic roof, the years roll back and we see the figure and hear again the ringing tones of your

great orator, Patrick Henry, declaring to the first Continental Congress "The distinctions

between Virginians, Pennsylvanians, New Yorkers, and New Englanders are no more. I am no Virginian, but an American." A distinguished Frenchman, as he stood among the graves at Arlington, said, "Only a great people is capable of a great civil war." Let us add with thankful hearts that only a great people is capable of a great reconciliation. Side by side, Virginia and Massachusetts led the colonies into the War for Independence. Side by side they founded the government of the United States. Morgan and Green, Lee and Knox, Moultrie and Prescott, men of the South and men of the North, fought shoulder to shoulder, and wore the same uniform of buff and blue, --the uniform of Washington.

     Your presence here brings back their noble memories, it breathes the spirit of Concord, and unites with so may other voices in the irrevocable message of union and good will. Mere sentiment all this, some may say, but it is sentiment, true sentiment, that has moved the world. Sentiment fought war, and sentiment has reunited us. When the war closed it was proposed in the newspapers and elsewhere to give Governor Andrew who had sacrificed health and strength and property in his public duties, some immediately lucrative office, like the collectorship of the port of Boston. A friend asked him if he would take such a place. "No," he said he; "I have stood as high priest between the horns of the altar, and I have poured out upon it the best blood of Massachusetts, and I cannot take money for that." Mere sentiment truly, but the sentiment which ennobles and uplifts mankind. It is sentiment which so hollows a bit of torn, stained bunting, that men go gladly to their deaths to save it. So I say that the sentiment manifested by your presence here, brethren of Virginia sitting side by side with those who wore the blue, has a far-reaching and gracious influence, of more value than many practical things. It tells us these two grand old Commonwealth, parted in the shock of the Civil War, are once more side by side as in the days of the Revolution, never to part again. It tells us that the sons of Virginia and Massachusetts, if war should break again upon the country, will, as in the olden days, stand once more shoulder to shoulder, with no distinction in the colors that they wear. It is fraught with tidings of peace on earth, and you may read its meaning in the words on yonder picture, "Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children of (1101) Elsie Belle (Sprague) and Raphael Higgins

 

1201. Patatricia Marie (Higgins) Famiglietti.  Pat was born Mar 17, 1933 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, married Eugene Paul Famiglietti Feb 27, 1954, born May 7, 1932 in Washington, D.C...

     Patricia graduated from Sacred Heart Academy in Jun 1951 and attended Catholic University for two years.  On Feb 27, 1954 she married Gene Famiglietti.  Gene graduated from Gonzaga High School, June, 1950 and Bullis Prep June 1951.  He joined the Marine Corp in June of 1951 and fought in Korea.  His service # was 1994981.  His enlistment ended in June 1954.  He graduated from Maryland University in June 1958.  He worked many jobs during College as did Pat.  He started with Army Times Publishing Company in 1959 as a Reporter.  At the time of his death on May 26, 1980 he was Editor of The Army Times newspaper.  After Gene’s death, Pat, a stay at home Mom for her eight children, went to work at Bethesda Retirement and Nursing Center where she was Office Manager for the Nursing Department. She retired in February, 1999. While a stay at home mom, Pat was very active in her church, St. Jane de Chantal and in the CYO Catholic Youth Organization.  In Jul 1999 she moved to Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. She is very active at St. Edmond’s Catholic Church as head of the Environment and Arts Committee and a member of two quilting groups.

 

1202. Sprague Russel John Higgins, born Feb 5, 1938.  Served in U.S. Army.  Married Shelby Bryant, Apr 7, 1967.  Shelby was born Oct 21, 1946.  They were divorced in 1981.

 

1203. Dennis Barney Higgins.  Born Aug 25, 1942.  Served in U.S. Navy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children of (1102) Nicholas Abraham and Ruth Elizabeth (Moore) Sprague

 

1204. NICHOLAS KEITH, b. Feb 13, 1932 in Rudyard Mi.; m. Jun 28, 1958 to Elaine Maxine, daughter of Donner Albyn and Doris May (Peterson) Dowd. He attended elementary school in Sandusky Mi. and completed his first year of High School in Sandusky. He graduated from Rudyard High School in 1950. Keith entered the U.S. Navy in 1951 and was honorably discharged in 1955. Next, he entered the Sault Branch of Michigan Tech., and continued on to Western Michigan University where he received his B.Sc. in 1959 and his M.A. in 1963. Keith spent his working years in education starting out as an Elementary teacher, Elementary Principal and later as a Title 1 Co-ordinator. Currently he is a member of Grace Bible Church. Elaine was b. Nov 7, 1936 in Sault Ste. Marie, Mi. graduating from Rudyard High School in 1954, Western Michigan University (BA) in 1958 and Northern Michigan University (MA) in 1985.  She worked as School librarian, English teacher and music teacher in Rudyard High School.

 

 

 

1205.  DONALD ERIC. b. Sep 13, 1938, in the morning on election day, eleven and three quarters pounds twenty six and one half inches long, born in the same room that his mother was, Custer Twp., Sanilac Co., MI; m. Nov 10, 1962 to Artice Ann Luzius at Kincheloe Air Force Base, MI.  Artice Ann was b. Nov 8, 1942, at Beyer Hospital in Ypsilanti, MI.  She attended Parkdale Elementary School, Manistee High School, and Manistee, MI and graduated from St. Lawrence Hospital School for Radiography and has worked as a Registered Radiological Technician since 1962. She is the daughter of Robert Phillip and Gladys Malvina (Peterson) Luzius. Eric attended Sandusky MI Elementary, Rudyard, MI Elementary, Rabbits Back School St.Ignace Township, MI, LaSalle High School, St.Ignace, MI, Michigan Tech., University of Colorado, Lansing Community College, Michigan State University.   He received a B.A. from Michigan State University and M.A. from Eastern Michigan University. He served in the U.S.A.F. from 1956 to 1969, Charter President of the South Lyon Lions Club, and a school teacher in South Lyon High School, South Lyon, MI from 1971 to 1999.  He does not have a religious affiliation and sometimes shows contempt for organized religion. He at the same time has a deep faith in Jesus Christ and believes that the Bible as it was originally given is the infallible word of God.

 

 

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (8) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (7) Martin Moore b. 1812, (6) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (5) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (4) James Moore b. 1717, (3) Andrew Moore b. 1688, (2) James Moore b. 1630, (1) John O’Moore b. 1588.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (8) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (7) Martin Moore b. 1812, (6) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (5) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (4) James Moore b. 1717, (3) Andrew Moore b. 1688, (2) James Moore b. 1630, (1) Mary Fenwick b. 1618.

 

(9) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (8) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (7) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (6) Martin Moore b. 1812, (5) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (4) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (3) James Moore b. 1717, (2) Andrew Moore b. 1688,

(1) Unknown Guyon b. 1647-48.

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (7) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (6) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (5) Martin Moore b. 1812, (4) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (3) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (2) James Moore b. 1717, (1) Margaret Wilson

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (13) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (12) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (11) Martin Moore b. 1812, (10) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (9) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (8) Ann Starr b. 1717,  (7) Jeremiah Starr b. 1690, (6) John Star b. 1648, (5) Capt. John Caran Starr b. 1615-25, (4) John Starr b. 1591, (3 ) William Starr b. 1543, (2 ) John Starr b. 1520, (1) John Starr b. 1490.

 

(13) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (12) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (11) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (10) Martin Moore b. 1812, (9) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (8) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (7) Ann Starr b. 1717,  (6) Jeremiah Starr b. 1690, (5) John Star b. 1648, (4) Capt. John Caran Starr b. 1615-25, (3) John Starr b. 1591, (2) Joanne Mitchell b. 1571, (1) John Mitchell.

 

(13) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (12) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (11) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (10) Martin Moore b. 1812, (9) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (8) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (7) Ann Starr b. 1717,  (6) Jeremiah Starr b. 1690, (5) John Star b. 1648, (4) Capt. John Caran Starr b. 1615-25, (3) John Starr b. 1591, (2) Joanne Mitchell b. 1571, (1) Emlyn Weeks b. 1550.

 

(11) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (10) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (9) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (8) Martin Moore b. 1812, (7) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (6) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (5) Ann Starr b. 1717, (4) Jeremiah Starr b. 1690, (3) John Star b. 1648, (2) Capt. John Caran Starr b. 1615-25, (1) Dorthy Bayley.

 

(9) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (8) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (7) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (6) Martin Moore b. 1812, (5) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (4) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (3) Ann Starr b. 1717, (2) Jeremiah Starr b. 1690, (1) Mary Thompson b. 1648.

 

(14) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (13) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (12) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (11) Martin Moore b. 1812, (10) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (9) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (8) Ann Starr b. 1717, (7) Rebecca Jackson b. 1697, (6) Isaac Jackson b. 1663, (5) Anthony Jackson b. 1628, (4) Anthony Jackson b. 1599, (3)  Richard Jackson b. 1571, (2) Anthony Jackson b. 1540,  (1) Richard Jackson b. 1520.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (8) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (7) Martin Moore b. 1812, (6) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (5) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (4) Ann Starr b. 1717, (3) Rebecca Jackson b. 1697, (2) Ann Evans b. 1665, (1) Roland Evans.

 

(14) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (13) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (12) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (11) Martin Moore b. 1812, (10) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (9) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (8) Ann Starr b. 1717, (7) Rebecca Jackson b. 1697, (6) Isaac Jackson b. 1663, (5) Anthony Jackson b. 1628, (4) Anthony Jackson b. 1599, (3)  Richard Jackson b. 1571, (2) Anthony Jackson b. 1540,  (1) Ann Todd 1515.

 

 (14) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (13) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (12) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (11) Martin Moore b. 1812, (10) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (9) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (8) Ann Starr b. 1717, (7) Rebecca Jackson b. 1697, (6) Isaac Jackson b. 1663, (5) Anthony Jackson b. 1628, (4) Anthony Jackson b. 1599, (3)  Richard Jackson b. 1571, (2) Margaret Frobisher b. 1542, (1) Gregory Forbisher 152?.

 

(15) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (14) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (13) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (12) Martin Moore b. 1812, (11) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (10) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (9) Ann Starr b. 1717, (8) Rebecca Jackson b. 1697, (7) Isaac Jackson b. 1663, (6) Anthony Jackson b. 1628, (5) Anthony Jackson b. 1599, (4)  Richard Jackson b. 1571, (3) Margaret Frobisher b. 1542, (2) Unknown Yorke b. 1523, (1) Sir John Yorke 1523.

 

(13) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (12) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (11) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (10) Martin Moore b. 1812, (9) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (8) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (7) Ann Starr b. 1717, (6) Rebecca Jackson b. 1697, (5) Isaac Jackson b. 1663, (4) Anthony Jackson b. 1628, (3) Anthony Jackson b. 1599, (2) Ursala Hildyard b. 1577, (1) Richard Hildyard.

 

(13) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (12) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (11) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (10) Martin Moore b. 1812, (9) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (8) Jeremiah Moore b.1745, (7) Ann Starr b. 1717, (6) Rebecca Jackson b. 1697, (5) Isaac Jackson b. 1663, (4) Anthony Jackson b. 1628, (3) Anthony Jackson b. 1599, (2) Ursala Hildyard b. 1577, (1) Jane Thweedge.

 

(9) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (8) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (7) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (6) Martin Moore b. 1812, (5) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (4) Mary Wildman b.1747, (3) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (2) Joseph Wildman b. 1683, (1) Martin Wildman 1633.

 

(9) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (8) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (7) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (6) Martin Moore b. 1812, (5) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (4) Mary Wildman b.1747, (3) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (2) Joseph Wildman b. 1683, (1) Ann Ward 1658.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (8) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (7) Martin Moore b. 1812,

(6) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (5) Mary Wildman b.1747, (4) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (3) Joseph Wildman b. 1683, (2) Ann Ward 1658, (1) John Ward 1629.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (8) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (7) Martin Moore b. 1812, (6) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (5) Mary Wildman b.1747, (4) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (3) Joseph Wildman b. 1683, (2) Ann Ward 1658, (1) Jane Ashton 1624.

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (7) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (6) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (5) Martin Moore b. 1812, (4) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (3) Mary Wildman b.1747, (2) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (1) Sarah Wilson 1695.

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (7) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (6) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (5) Martin Moore b. 1812, (4) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (3) Mary Wildman b.1747, (2) Elizabeth Yates 1708, (1) James Yates 1663.

 

(9) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (8) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (7) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (6) Martin Moore b. 1812, (5) Jacob Moore b. 1768, (4) Mary Wildman b.1747, (3) Elizabeth Yates 1708, (2) Agnes Webster 1698, (1) Peter Webster.

 

(9) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (8) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (7) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (6) Martin Moore b. 1812, (5) Rachel Wildman. (4) Joseph Wildman 174?, (3) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (2) Joseph Wildman b. 1683, (1) Martin Wildman 1633.

 

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (8) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (7) Martin Moore b. 1812, (6) Rachel Wildman 1768, (5) Joseph Wildman 174?,  (4) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (3) Joseph Wildman b. 1683, (2) Ann Ward 1658, (1) John Ward 1629.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (8) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (7) Martin Moore b. 1812, (6) Rachel Wildman 1768, (5) Joseph Wildman 174?,  (4) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (3) Joseph Wildman b. 1683, (2) Ann Ward 1658, (1) Jane Ashton 1624.

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (7) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (6) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (5) Martin Moore b. 1812, (4) Rachel Wildman 1768, (3) Joseph Wildman 174?,  (2) Jacob Wildman b. 1718, (1) Sarah Wilson 1695.

 

(6) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (5) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (4) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (3) Martin Moore b. 1812, (2) Rachel Wildman 1768, (1) Rebecca Griffa.

 

(4) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (3) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (2) Andrew Moore b. 1843, (1) Mary A. Fluellen.

 

(3) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (2) Allyn Keith Moore b. 18781, (1) Augusta Fennemore Hart b. 1847.

 

(4) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (3) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (2) Augusta Fennemore Hart b. 1847, (1) John Harris Hart b. 1807.

 

(4) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (3) Allyn Keith Moore b. 1878, (2) Augusta Fennemore Hart b. 1847, (1) Sarah Hogg b. 1806.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (8) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (7) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (6) Isaac Putney b. 1776, (5) Isaac Putney, (4) Joseph Putney b. 1729-30, (3) Benjamin Putney, (2) Joseph Putney,     (1) John Putney b. 1636.

 

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (8) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (7) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (6) Isaac Putney b. 1776, (5) Isaac Putney, (4) Joseph Putney b. 1729-30, (3) Benjamin Putney, (2) Joseph Putney, 

(1) Judith Cooke b. 1643.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (8) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (7) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (5) Isaac Putney b. 1776, (4) Isaac Putney, (3) Joseph Putney b. 1729-30, (2) Benjamin Putney, (1) Sarah MacIntire.

 

(10) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (9) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (8) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (7) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (6) Isaac Putney b. 1776, (5) Isaac Putney, (4) Joseph Putney b. 1729-30, (1) Abigail Bally.

 

(7) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (6) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (5) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (4) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (3) Isaac Putney b. 1776, (2) Isaac Putney, (1) Mehitable Brown

 

(6) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (5) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (4) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (3) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (2) Isaac Putney b. 1776, (1) Dorcas MacIntire.

 

(5) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (4) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (3) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (2) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (1)Susanna Straiter b. 1777-80.

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (7) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (6) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (5) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (4)Susanna Straiter b. 1777-80, (3) Henry Straiter b. 1755, (2) John Simon Straiter b. 1721, (1) Johann Wilhelm Strader.

 

(6) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (5) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (4) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (3) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (2)Susanna Straiter b. 1777-80, (1) Nancy Elizabeth Robinson.

 

(7) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (6) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (5) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (4) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (3)Susanna Straiter b. 1777-80, (2) Henry Straiter b. 1755, (1) Sophia Elizabeth DeForest b. 1722.

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (7) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (6) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (5) Obadiah Putney b. 1804, (4)Susanna Straiter b. 1777-80, (3) Henry Straiter b. 1755, (2) John Simon Straiter b. 1721, (1) Catherine Smuch

 

(4) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (3) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (2) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (1) Anna McConnel b. 1798.

 

(5) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (4) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (3) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (2) Anna McConnel b. 1798,

(1)  Moses McConnel.

 

(4) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (3) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (2) Elmore Putney b. 1839, (1) Anna McConnel b. 1798,

(1) Sally Unknown.

 

(5) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (4) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (3) Harriet Davis Porteas. (2) Moore Lee Porteus,

(1) William Porteus.

 

(5) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (4) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (3) Harriet Davis Porteas. (2) Moore Lee Porteus, (1) Anna Lee.

 

(5) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (4) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (3) Harriet Davis Porteas. (2) Elizabeth Hiester Davis b. 1805, (1) Mathew Davis.

 

(7) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (6) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (5) Harriet Davis Porteas. (4) Elizabeth Hiester Davis b. 1805, (4) Elizabeth Hiester, (3) John Hiester b. 1745, (2) Daniel Hiester b. 1712, (1) John Joseph Hiester.

 

(5) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (4) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (3) Harriet Davis Porteas. (2) Elizabeth Hiester, (1) Hannah Pawling.

 

(8) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (7) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (6) Harriet Davis Porteas. (5) Elizabeth Hiester Davis b. 1805, (4) Elizabeth Hiester, (3) John Hiester b. 1745, (2) Daniel Hiester b. 1712, (1) Katharine Elizabeth Closs.

 

(7) Ruth Elizabeth Moore b. 1909, (6) Mabel Putney b. 1882, (5) Harriet Davis Porteas. (4) Elizabeth Hiester Davis b. 1805, (3) Elizabeth Hiester, (2) John Hiester b. 1745, (1) Catharine Shuler.

 

 

 

 

Children of (1103) Donald  Munson and Mildred (Richter) Sprague

 

1206.  Annette.  Born February 5, 1938 in Stevens Pt., Wisconsin, married in Spartenburg, S.C. to Donald Nelson Aug 31, 1954; divorced July 1957.  Married Robert George Katarincic in Escanaba, Michigan March 23, 1962.  She attended American School, Chicago, Ill. And Northern Michigan University in Marquette, MI.  Annette works as a Chemical Dependency Counselor.  Employees Assistance Program Specialist.  She is a member of Presbyterian Church, Employees Assistance Prof. Association Certified Addictions Prof., M.A.D.D., and Amer. Contract Bridge League.  Robert was born Aug 15, 1932 in Escanaba, MI.  He is a Chief Engineer, American S.S. Co.. His parents are John and Mary (Minerak) Katarincic.  They currently live at 2641 Gateway Dr., West Palm Beach, FL. 33415-7910

 

1207.     Donald b. 1939, entered U.S.A.F. in 1956 and retired from the Air Force 

 

 

Children of (1104) Aaron B. and Phyllis  Sprague

 

1208. Jane Ann, b. Jul 1940, St Mary Hospital, Rochester Minn., d. Jun 26, 1946, burial Grand Lawn Cemetery, Detroit Mi.

 

1209. Aaron James b. Jun 14, 1944, graduated from Walled Lake H.S. MI.  Attended  Cedarville College  Ind., and the U of M Dearborn MI.  He works as an electrical millwright for Ford Motor Co. m. Mary Stewart. 181 W. Drahner, Oxford MI 48051

 

 

Children of (1104) Aaron B. and Betty Jo (Card) Sprague

 

1210.  Laura Jane b. Aug 29, 1960 m. Al Gibson on Apr 19, 1986.  Al and Laura both graduated from Temple Baptist High School in 1978, Detroit, Mi.

 

 

 

Children of (1201) Pat (Higgins) and Gene Famighetti

 

1301. Cara Marie  b. Sep 16, 1956. m.  Jan 7, 1978 Brian Burke born in 1956.  Divorced in 1985. 

 

1302. Brian Eugene b. Jul 5, 1958.  m. Dec 31, 1984 to Elizabeth (Betty) Ann Spear born Oct 5, 1952.

 

1303. Laura Jean b. Jun 13 1960. m. Feb 28, 1984 to Ronald Little born Dec 25, 1952.

 

1304. Mary Pat b. Oct 22, 1963.  m. Jun 29, 1985 to James Vernon (Butch) Mattingly III, born Jan 25, 1962.

 

1305. Gene Michael b. May 5, 1966.  m. Feb 12, 1994 to Janet Powala Kozel born Jul 13, 1961.

 

1306. Guy Martin b. Aug 31, 1968.  m. Dec 4, 1993 to Jennifer Mazo born Oct 15, 1969.

 

1307. Julie Ann, b. Feb 15, 1971.  m. Nov 7, 1998 to Paul Christian Mattoon born Nov 12, 1966.

 

1308. Beth Ann b. Jun 11, 1974. m. Sep 11, 1999 to Christopher Glenn Bender born Jun 3, 1972.

 

 

Children of (1202) Sprague and Heather Shelby (       ) Higgins

 

1309.  Heather Colleen b. Feb 2, 1968

 

1310.     Brian Sprague, b. December 21, 1974, weight 7 pounds 14 oz.

 

 

Children of (1204) Nicholas Keith and Elaine Maxine (Dowd)

Sprague

 

1311.  Matthew Nicholas, b. Jan 8, 1961 in Kalamazoo, Mi.. Matt attended elementary and high school in Rudyard, Mi., and Northern Michigan University where he graduated from a technical course. He works as a journeymen welder for Olofsson Fabrication at Kinross, Mi. He has served in the Michigan National Guard since  1982 where he works as a boat commander in his bridge building unit. Matt is a member of Grace Bible Church Fibre, Mi..

 

1312. Mark Allyn  b. Mar 10, 1964 at 7:54 A.M., 10 pounds ¾ oz., 21 ½ inches long, in St.Ignace, Mi.. Mark attended elementary and high school in Rudyard, Mi, and Northern Michigan University where he graduated in 1986 with a B.S. (Math Major and Business minor). Mark works as an Actuary for Zurich and Kemper Life Insurance at Long Grove, Illinois. He is a member of Grace Bible Church Fibre, Mi.. Mark married Karen Young on Jun 5, 1993 at the State Park near Richmond, Illinois. Karen was born April 9, 1962 and is the daughter of John and Patricia Young. She graduated from Chicago-Kent School of Law in 1996. Mark and Karen live in Crystal Lake, Illinois with their two children.

 

1313. Beth Elaine (Sprague) Strong, b. Oct 2, 1966 in St.Ignace, Mi.. Beth attended elementary and high school in Rudyard, Mi., and graduated from Northern Michigan University in 1988, (Elementary Education). She taught school in Germany and currently works at home raising two sons and a daughter. She is a member of Grace Bible Church Fibre, Mi.. Beth married Bryan Strong on May 7, 1988 at Kincheloe, Mi.. Bryan was b. in 1964 is the son of Dale and Eileen (Einung) Strong who reside in Grandbury, TX. He graduated from West Point in 1986, fulfilled his service obligation with the U.S. Army with the rank of Captain, and currently is a Freight Flow Manager for the Walmart  distribution center in Marcy, Ny.  They live in Rome, Ny.

 

(3)Elaine Maxine Dowd, (2)Donner Albyn Dowd, (1)Edward Dowd.

 

(5)Elaine Maxine Dowd, (4)Doris May Peterson, (3)Christian Arthur Peterson, (2)Albert Peterson, (1)Erasmus Peterson, (Denmark).

 

(5)Elaine Maxine Dowd, (4)Doris May Peterson, (3)Christian Arthur Peterson, (2)Albert Peterson (1) Mary Johnson, (Denmark).

(5)Elaine Maxine Dowd, (4)Doris May Peterson, (3)Christian Arthur Peterson, (2)Albert Peterson, (1)Anna Ericson, (Germany).

 

(6)Elaine Maxine Dowd, (5)Doris May Peterson, (4)Amanda Beatta Benson, (3)Erick Benson, (2)Bengt Hakanson, (1)Hakan Bengtsson, (Sweden).

 

(7)Elaine Maxine Dowd, (6)Doris May Peterson, (5)Amanda Beatta Benson, (4)Erick Benson, (3)Bengt Hakanson, (2)Johanna Lorensdotter, (1)Loren Johnson, (Sweden).

 

(7)Elaine Maxine Dowd, (6)Doris May Peterson, (5)Amanda Beatta Benson, (4)Erick Benson, (3)Bengt Hakanson, (2)Johanna Lorensdotter, (1)Elina Knutsdotter, (Sweden).

 

 

Children of (1205) Donald Eric and Artice Ann (Luzius) Sprague

 

1314.  Kevin Eric, b. July 3, 1965, 11:55 A.M., 8 pounds 13 oz., in Mercy Community Hospital, Manistee, MI.  Kevin attended Sayre Elementary School, South Lyon High School, South Lyon, Mi., two years Eastern Michigan University (Business and Mathematics), and graduated with a B. S. in Mechanical Engineering From Lawrence Technological University.  He worked as a Mechanical Engineer for Jervis B. Webb Corporation in Farmington Hills, MI during the time that he was working on his degree. He currently works for the Corps of Engineering in Sault Ste. Marie, MI, where he is the Chief of Lock Operation and Engineering Division. Kevin married Penney Plastino on July 23, 1996 in Fibre, MI, and on August 10, 1996 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. Penney was born November 16, 1963 in Elliot Lake, Ontario, six pounds 10 ½ oz and is the daughter of Geno Geniale and Marlene Pearl (Burnett) Plastino of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. Penney attended Alex Muir Public Elementary, Sault Collegiate High School and Sir James Dunn for grade thirteen, in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario.  She graduated from Guelph University, with a B.A. Sc. Degree.  She works in the area of special education for the Sault Ste Marie, Ontario schools. They reside at 703 Cedar, Sault Ste. Marie, MI.

 

(5)Artice Ann Luzius, (4)Gladys Peterson, (3)Arthur Thorwald Peterson,  (2)Albert Peterson, (1)Erasmus Peterson, (Denmark).

 

(5)Artice Ann Luzius, (4)Gladys Peterson, (3)Arthur Thorwald Peterson, (2)Albert Peterson (1) Mary Johnson, (Denmark).

 

(4)Artice Ann Luzius, (3)Gladys Peterson, (2)Arthur Thorwald Peterson, (1)Anna Ericson, (Germany).

 

(6)Artice Ann Luzius, (5)Gladys Peterson, (4)Anna Bernadine Benson, (3)Erick Benson, (2)Bengt Hakanson, (1)Hakan Bengtsson, (Sweden).

 

(7)Artice Ann Luzius, (6)Gladys Peterson, (5)Anna Bernadine Benson, (4)Erick Benson, (3)Bengt Hakanson, (2)Johanna Lorensdotter, (1)Loren Johnson, (Sweden).

 

(7)Artice Ann Luzius, (6)Gladys Peterson, (5)Anna Bernadine Benson, (4)Erick Benson, (3)Bengt Hakanson, (2)Johanna Lorensdotter, (1)Elina Knutsdotter, (Sweden).

 

(3)Artice Ann Luzius, (2)Robert Phillip, (1)Edward F. Luzius, (Alsace Lorrane).

 

(4)Artice Ann Luzius, (3)Robert Phillip, (2)Mary M. Purdy, (1)Caleb A. Purdy, (England).

 

(4)Artice Ann Luzius, (3)Robert Phillip, (2)Mary M. Purdy, (1)Adeline ____, (England)                                                       

 

 

 

Children of (1206) Annette (Sprague) and Donald Nelson

 

1315.  Laurie Beth. Name was changed to Laurie Beth Katarincic, born July 2, 1955; in Escanaba, Mi., died January 15, 1974 in Green Bay, Wis.; interred Escanaba, Mi., Lakeview Cemetery. Methodist. She graduated from Escanaba Sr. High School and was a

student at Bay De Noc Comm. College when she died in a traffic accident.

 

Children of 1206 Annette (Sprague) and Robert Katarincic

 

1316.  Robert, "Scott". Born November 13, 1962 in Escanaba, Mi.. He attended John Lemmer elementary school, Escanaba Sr. High School and Northern Michigan Univ. He works as a Systems Analyst, Senior Systems Engineer.

 

 

 

Children of (1209) Aaron James and Mary ( Stewart) Sprague

 

1317.   Staci Ann Jane.  Born March 11, 1966, weight 7 pds. 8

oz., 20 inch. long.  m. Steve Smith Aug 19, 1989. She is a Registered Nurse. Resides in Gladwin, MI. Graduated from Temple Baptist High School in 1984.

 

 

 

1318. Sara Amy Jo, b. Dec 7, 1970. M. Christopher Michael Obranovic on St Patrick day Mar 17, 2000.  Graduated from Oxford High School, MI in 1988.   She is a Registered Nurse.

 

 

1319. Aaron James, Welder, Radio announcer for WMUZ, b. Aug 17, 1976.  Graduated from Oxford High School in 1995.

 

 

 

1320. Andrew Joel , b. Sep 28, 1978. Works construction.  Graduated from Oxford High School in 1996.

 

 

Children of (1210) Laura Jane (Sprague) and Al Gibson

 

1321.     Nicole Erin, b. Jul 6, 1990 in Providence Hospital Southfield MI.

 

 

Children of (1301) Cara Marie (Famiglietti) and Brian Burke

 

1421.  Kathleen Genevieve b. Oct 28, 1978.

 

1422.  Colleen Marie b. Aug 23, 1981.

 

 

Children of (1303) Laura Jean (Famiglietti) and Ronald Little

 

1423.  Allison b. Sept 29, 1985.

1424.  Craig b. Apr 3, 1990.

 

 

Children of (1304) Mary Pat (Famiglietti) and James Mattingly III

 

1425.  Amy Lee b. Oct 8, 1997.

1426.  Sarah Marie b. Jun 6, 1999

 

 

Children of (1305) Gene Michael and Janet Powala (Kozel) Famiglietti

 

1427.  Bethany Lynn b. Jul 31, 1990.

1428.  Gina Marie b. Jan 13, 1997.

1429.  Jared Paul b. Dec 4, 1998

 

 

Children of (1307) Julie Ann (Famiglietti) and Paul Christian Mattoon

 

1430.  Ellie Rose b. Sep 7, 2002.

 

 

Children of (1313) Beth Elaine (Sprague) and Bryan Dale Strong

 

1401. Jacob Dale  b. Apr 12, 1993, 7 pounds 6 oz., 20 1/2 inch., in Ft.Benning, Ga.

 

1402. Emma Kate b. Nov 16, 1995, 7 lbs. 13 oz., 20 1/2 inches in Oneida, Ny.

 

 

1403. Benjamin Nicholas b. June 1, 1998, 8 lbs. 1 oz., 21 inches, in Oneida, Ny.

 

 

 

Children of (1314) Kevin Eric and Penney Louise (Plastino) Sprague

 

1406.  Selina Louise, born Thursday Oct 19, 2000, 2 P.M., 7 pounds 1 ounce, 19 ¼ inches long in War Memorial Hospital, Sault Ste Marie, MI.

 

1406.  Nicholas Edward, born Friday Feb 7, 2003, 2:02 A.M.  7 pounds 15.9 oz., 20 inch long. in War Memorial Hospital, Sault Ste Marie, MI.

 

(3)Penney Plastino, (2) Geniale Plastino, (1)Frank Plastino, (Italy).

 

(3)Penney Plastino, (2) Geniale Plastino, (1) Josephine Belleau, (Munising MI Ojibwa)

 

(3)Penney Plastino, (2) Marlene Pearl Burnett, (1) Edward Burnett.

 

(3)Penney Plastino, (2) Marlene Pearl Burnett, (1) Verna Dawson.

 

 

Geno b. Sep 28, 1936

Marlene b. Aug 22, 1938

 

 

Children of (1317) Stacy (Sprague) and Steve Smith

 

1410.  Chase b. Jul 23, 1990.

 

1411.  Rachel  b. Jul 18, 1994.

 

1412.     Zacary  b. Aug 24, 1997.

 

 

 

Children of (1318) Sara Amy Jo (Sprague) and Christopher Michael Obranovic

 

1413.  Alayna Jayne b. Jun 27, 1999, 20 inch, 8 pounds 9 oz..

 

1414.     Christopher Michael b. Feb 23, 2002.

 

Children of (1320) Andrew Joel and Amy (Unknown) Sprague

 

1415.  Andrew (Drew), born Wed. 6:30 P.M. Jan 26, 2005, 20inch., 7 pounds 6 oz.

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